Greek Bastardy in the Classical and Hellenistic Periods

Front Cover
Societies are defined at their margins. In the ancient Greek world bastards were often marginalized, their affinities being with the female, the alien, the servile, the poor, and the sick. The study of bastardy in ancient Greece is therefore of an importance that goes far beyond the subject's intrinsic interest, and it provides insights into the structure of Greek society as a whole. This is the first full-length book on the subject, and it reviews major evidence from Athens, Sparta, Gortyn, and Hellenistic Egypt, as well as collating and analysing fragmentary evidence from other Greek states. Dr Ogden shows how attitudes towards legitimacy differed across the various city states, and analyses their developments across time. He also advances new interpretations of more familiar problems of Athenian bastardy, such as Pericles' citizenship law. The book should interest historians of a wide range of social topics - from law and the economy, to sexuality and the study of women in antiquity.
 

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Contents

The Citation of Inscriptions ix
1
The Diachronic Development of Athenian Bastardy
32
The Process
83
The Protection
136
Common Bastardy
217
Royal Bastardy
252
Gortyn
263
Io Bastardy in the Cities of the Classical Period
277
I2 Greeks and Barbarians
322
The Chora
328
The Cities
348
Conclusion
362
Gynaikonomoi Controllers of Women
364
References
377
Index
411
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Daniel Ogden is at University College of Swansea.

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