Greek Thought, Arabic Culture: The Graeco-Arabic Translation Movement in Baghdad and Early ʻAbbāsid Society (2nd-4th/8th-10th Centuries)

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Psychology Press, 1998 - History - 230 pages
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From the middle of the eighth century to the tenth century, almost all non-literary and non-historical secular Greek books, including such diverse topics as astrology, alchemy, physics, botany and medicine, that were not available throughout the eastern Byzantine Empire and the Near East, were translated into Arabic.
Greek Thought, Arabic Cultureexplores the major social, political and ideological factors that occasioned the unprecedented translation movement from Greek into Arabic in Baghdad, the newly founded capital of the Arab dynasty of the 'Abbasids', during the first two centuries of their rule. Dimitri Gutas draws upon the preceding historical and philological scholarship in Greco-Arabic studies and the study of medieval translations of secular Greek works into Arabic and analyses the social and historical reasons for this phenomenon.
Dimitri Gutas provides a stimulating, erudite and well-documented survey of this key movement in the transmission of ancient Greek culture to the Middle Ages.
 

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Contents

Early Abbasid Imperial Ideology and
28
Social and Religious Discourse
61
Domestic and Foreign Policies and
75
Translation in the Service of Applied and Theoretical
107
Patrons Translators Translations
121
Translators and Translations
136
Developments from
151
Arabic Philosophy and Science
166
The Translation Movement
175
Epilogue
187
Greek Works Translated into Arabic
193
Chronological Bibliography of Studies on the Significance
212
Index of Manuscripts
230
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About the author (1998)

Dimitri Gutas is professor of Near Eastern languages at Yale University. He is the author of Greek Wisdom Literature in Arabic Translation and Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition published in the Netherlands.

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