Greek Tragedy on the American Stage: Ancient Drama in the Commercial Theater, 1882-1994

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - Performing Arts - 161 pages
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During the past century, the interpretation given by the various directors staging Greek drama has varied, and the critical reception accorded the productions has also altered. While the texts of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides remain constant, the meanings drawn from their plays do not. The director who decides to offer a Greek tragedy in the modern American commercial theater believes in the ability of the text to reach the contemporary audience, and the reviewers assess the success of the venture: their words become a record of both a particular performance and the time in which it played. Hartigan explores how drama and society interact and witnesses the continued vitality of the Greek tragedy.

 

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Contents

II
1
III
7
IV
11
V
15
VII
19
VIII
20
IX
25
XI
35
XXIII
102
XXIV
104
XXV
111
XXVI
112
XXVII
118
XXVIII
120
XXIX
124
XXX
131

XII
39
XIII
40
XIV
43
XV
48
XVI
59
XVII
61
XVIII
67
XIX
68
XX
81
XXI
89
XXII
101
XXXI
132
XXXII
135
XXXIII
138
XXXV
139
XXXVI
141
XXXVII
143
XXXVIII
147
XXXIX
155
XL
157
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Page x - Collection at the Library of the Performing Arts of the New York Public Library in New York City.
Page xi - I am grateful, also, to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a Summer Travel Grant to support one trip to the Billy Rose Theatre Collection in New York City.

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About the author (1995)

KARELISA V. HARTIGAN is Professor of Classics at the University of Florida. She is the author of several books including Ambiguity and Self-Deception: The Apollo and Artemis Plays of Euripides.

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