Greene & Greene

Front Cover
Gibbs Smith, 2005 - Architecture - 222 pages
Going beyond documenting their work, author Marvin Rand captures the emotion and art of the buildings created by the legendary California brothers and architects, Charles and Henry Greene, in Greene & Greene. Rand's images focus on details-architectural elements, lighting, and materials-which create the illusion that one could reach out and touch them, feeling the sensuousness of line and texture in each design.
The art of the Greenes is interpreted by Rand in 150 choice photographs, documenting the culmination of the Craftsman period and highlighting the art of workmanship by the architects.
Rand has tried to extend architecture as a form of art, exploring the quality of emotion expressed in light and shadow, using what is evident in architectural design. He has been published in numerous books and magazines throughout the world and has been showcased in major exhibitions. Rand lives in Marina del Rey, California.
Daniel Gregory graduated from Yale in 1973, and after earning a Ph. D. in Architecture from the University of California-Berkeley, he taught architectural history at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Now Sunset magazine's home editor, he has served on national juries for the American Institute of Architects.
 

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Contents

The Early Years
iv
The Grand Era
27
The Carmee Experience
155
Furniture Lighting and Decorative Accessories
191
The Painting of Charles Summer Greene
209
StainedGlass Window
214
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Marvin Rand has tried to extend architecture in an art, showing the quality of emotion through light and shadow, using what is in the subject matter-strong line and form. He has been published in numerous books and magazines throughout the world and has been showcased in major exhibitions. Rand lives in Marina del Rey, California. Daniel Gregory graduated from Yale in 1973, and after earning a Ph. D. in Architecture from U. C. Berkeley, he taught architectural history at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Now Sunset magazine's home editor, he has served on national juries for the American Institute of Architects.

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