Greening International Law

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Philippe Sands
Earthscan, 1993 - Business & Economics - 260 pages
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Environmental problems do not respect international boundaries; they affect the entire globe, and dealing with them is a matter for international political negotiation, law and institutions. Greening International Law assesses the extent to which the international community has so far adapted to address environmental problems, and examines the fundamental changes needed to the structure and organisation of the legal system and its institutions. The contributors to this volume have all played a central role in the development of international environmental law over the past decade, and their essays will be of interest to all those professionally, academically or individually concerned with the resolution of environmental problems.
 

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Contents

A New Basis for International
20
Defending the Global Commons
35
Enforcing Environmental Security
50
Greening Bretton Woods
65
Greening the EEC Treaty
85
The GATT and the Environment
100
Environmental Law and Policy in Antarctica
122
Radioactive Waste Dumping at Sea
140
The Evolution of International Whaling
159
Technologybased Approaches Versus Marketbased
182
Notes and references
210
Glossary
245
List of Cases
252
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About the author (1993)

Philippe Sands is a practising Barrister and the Legal Director of the Foundation for International Environmental Law, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and Visiting Professor at New York University Law School.