Greifenstein

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Contents

I
1
III
26
IV
40
V
52
VI
65
VII
78
VIII
92
X
119
XI
132
XII
145
XIII
158
XIV
171
XV
185
XVI
198

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Page 164 - Greifenstein who lay upstairs, dead beside his dead wife, would have chosen to tramp far into the forest, with his gun on his shoulder and his dogs at his heels.
Page 55 - It is not necessary here to enter into a discussion of the treaty-making power or of the power of the President to enter into executive agreements with foreign •countries.
Page 57 - German beer, however, is not English ale, any more than it is to be confounded with the nauseous concoctions sold under its name in other countries. German beer is protected by law, and unoppressed by taxation. To adulterate it is a crime, an attempt to tax it would bring about a convulsion of the empire. Its use, in quantities that amaze the understanding, does not appear to have made Germans cowards in war, nor laggards in commerce; still less does it seem to have stupefied the national intellect,...
Page 114 - I was also married,' said Rieseneck at last, in a low voice, as though speaking to himself. ' You never saw my wife 1 ' he asked rather suddenly. ' No.' ' She died,' continued the other. ' It was very long ago — more than thirty years.' ' Indeed,' said Greifenstein, as though he cared very little to hear more. Again there was silence in the room, broken only by the crackling of the fir logs in the fire and by the ticking of the clock in its tall carved case in the corner. A full hour must elapse...
Page 146 - Post jucundam juventutem, Post molestam senectutem Nos habebit humus. Ubi sunt, qui ante nos In mundo fuere? Vadite ad superos, Transite ad inferos, Ubi jam fuere.
Page 116 - I thank you." He took the revolver from the case, examined it attentively and then slipped it into his breast-pocket. " I thank you," he repeated. " I do not possess one." Greifenstein wondered whether Rieseneck would have the courage to act upon the suggestion. To him there was nothing horrible in the idea. He was merely offering this despicable creature the means of escape from the world's contempt.
Page 139 - ... leaning back against the table and resting his two hands upon it. "You allow that I have got no personal advantage out of your friendship. I desired none. I only wanted to know you.

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