Grief as a Family Process: A Developmental Approach to Clinical Practice

Front Cover
Guilford Press, 1994 - Psychology - 307 pages
0 Reviews
This volume extends and integrates approaches such as developmental psychology, psychoanalytic and family systems theory, and cultural anthropology into a systemic developmental model that emphasizes ways grief can enhance the emotional growth of the family system. The model presented here views grief as a natural process through which a therapist can help families live, and even grow. Using examples from a wide variety of cultural traditions, this book argues for an attachment to, instead of detachment from, the deceased family member to sustain and enhance family development. This book is indispensable to any helping professional who works with grieving families, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, family therapists, physicians, nurses, hospice and patient home workers, clergypeople, and many others. It also serves as a text in courses on bereavement, family development, family and child therapy, and developmental psychopathology.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
A Systemic Developmental Approach
9
Grief in Adulthood
21
The Systemic Developmental
44
Child Grief
71
Weaving Grief
87
GRIEVING FAMILIES
123
Family Development and Adaptation
141
Enhancing Strategies
159
Its Impact on Adult and
185
CULTURAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS
215
The Interweaving of Cultural Background and
240
13 The Circumstances of the Death
252
Death and the MeaningMaking Process
264
Family Development and Grief Therapy
277
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Ester R. Shapiro, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in Psychology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and Research Associate at the Mauricio Gaston Institute for Latino Public Policy and Community Development. A Practicum Coordinator for the University of Massachusetts, Boston Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program, which trains students to conduct research and practice from multi-cultural and social developmental perspectives, she is coeditor of a book on psychoanalytic education and author of numerous papers on individual and family development. Dr. Shapiro has collaborated in founding interdisciplinary clinical training programs in psychoanalysis, family therapy, grief therapy, and culturally competent therapy. Her clinical practice, supervision, and public health consultations apply a social developmental and problem prevention approach to work with children, parents and families.

Bibliographic information