Ground-work of Culture: Address Delivered in King's College, London, at the Distribution of Prizes on October 2, 1883

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Churchill, 1883 - Culture - 30 pages
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Page 8 - This also we humbly and earnestly beg, that human things may not prejudice such as are divine ; neither that from the unlocking of the gates of sense, and the kindling of a greater natural light, anything of incredulity, or intellectual night, may arise in our minds towards divine mysteries.
Page 9 - ... divine mysteries. But rather, that by our mind thoroughly cleansed and purged from fancy and vanities, and yet subject and perfectly given up to the divine oracles, there may be given unto faith the things that are faith's.
Page 23 - ... the consummate practitioner, why need it go further ? ' But what if humanity shall warm it ? Then this interest, this excitement, this intellectual pleasure, is exalted into a principle, and invested with a moral motive, and passes into the heart. What if it be carried still further? What if religion should animate it? Why, then, happy indeed is that man whose mind, whose moral nature, and whose spiritual being, are all harmoniously engaged in the daily business of his life ; with whom the same...
Page 7 - as a body politic and corporate for the purpose of giving " instruction in the various branches of literature and science " and the doctrines and duties of Christianity as the same are " inculcated by the Church of England...
Page 23 - ... a skill in the use of remedies. And the skill may exalt the interest, and the interest may improve the skill, until, in process of time, experience forms the consummate practitioner. But does the interest of attending the sick necessarily stop here? The question may seem strange. If it has led to the readiest discernment and the highest skill, and formed the consummate practitioner, why need it go further ? But what if humanity shall warm it? Then this interest, this excitement, this intellectual...
Page 7 - as a College in which instruction in the doctrines and duties of Christianity as taught by the Church of England should be for ever combined with other branches of useful education".
Page 22 - This body must be your study, and your continual care — your active, willing, earnest care. Nothing must make you shrink from it. In its weakness and infirmities, in the dishonours of its corruption, you must still value it — still stay by it — to mark its hunger and thirst, its sleeping and waking, its heat and its cold; to hear its complaints, to register its groans.
Page 22 - ... register its groans. And is it possible to feel an interest in all this ? Ay, indeed it is ; a greater, far greater, interest than ever painter or sculptor took in the form and beauties of its health. Whence comes this interest ? At first, perhaps, it seldom comes naturally : a mere sense of duty must engender it ; and still, for awhile, a mere sense of duty must keep it alive.
Page 23 - If it has led to the readiest discernment and the highest skill, and formed the consummate practitioner, why need it go further ? But what if humanity shall warm it ? Then this interest, this excitement, this intellectual pleasure, is exalted into a principle, and invested with a moral motive and passes into the heart. What if it be carried still further ? What if religion should animate it ? Why, then happy indeed is that man whose mind, whose moral nature, and whose spiritual being are all harmoniously...
Page 23 - When the interest of attending the sick has reached this point, there arises from it, or has already arisen, a ready discernment of diseases, and a skill in the use of remedies. And the skill may exalt the interest, and the interest may improve the skill, until, in process of time, experience forms the consummate practitioner.

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