Ground Zero

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HarperPrism, 1995 - Fiction - 290 pages
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"A renowned nuclear weapons researcher is not only dead - he's been charred to a radioactive cinder. The incinerated remnants of Dr. Gregory are found curled in the corner of his laboratory at the Edward Teller Nuclear Research Facility near Oakland, California." "Since this is a death on Federal property, Mulder and Scully are hastily called in. As FBI agents who specialize in unexplained phenomena, they are the investigators of the X-Files, strange and inexplicable cases which are also mysteries that the FBI doesn't want solved." "Dr. Gregory's unique death quickly and clearly becomes an X-File. As Mulder and Scully begin their frustrating work, unearthing the top secret project that Dr. Gregory was working on, they confront a tight-lipped Federal bureaucracy whose job it is to stop questions before they are asked. One by one, Mulder and Scully hit dead ends, closed security clearances, and classified documents that no one wants them to see. But that doesn't stop Mulder and Scully from ripping the lid off Dr. Gregory's illegal project - "Bright Anvil" - a new type of flash nuclear explosive that has all the destructive power of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, but with a new design that leaves virtually no radioactive fallout. The implications for the modern world are deadly, and some radical protest groups will stop at nothing to prevent the test from happening." "When a second victim, completely unrelated to nuclear science or Dr. Gregory is obliterated in the New Mexico desert, and then a third dies the same way in Washington, D.C., Mulder and Scully begin to focus on the frightening dimensions of their task. The bizarre deaths cannot be a coincidence. And as they work to uncover the secret unifying element that unites these deaths, it becomes clear that this twisted puzzle has fatal consequences for the entire world."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
12
Section 3
24
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Kevin J. Anderson was born March 27, 1962, and raised in small town Oregon, Wisconsin. At eight years old, he wrote his first novel, three pages long on pink scrap paper on the typewriter in his father's den. He called it "The Injection," a story about a mad scientist who invents a formula that can bring anything to life. He submitted his first short story to a magazine when he was a freshman in high school, but it wasn't unitl two years later that he had a story accepted, for a magazine that paid only in copies. When he was a senior, he sold his first story for actual money, a whopping $12.50, but he never slowed down. He sold his first novel, Resurrection, Inc., by the time he turned 25. Anderson worked in California for twelve years as a technical writer and editor at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. After he had published ten of his own science fiction novels to wide critical acclaim, he came to the attention of Lucasfilm, and was offered the chance at writing Star Wars novels. Anderson signed the largest science fiction contract in publishing history, to write a prequel trilogy to Frank Herbert's classic Sci-Fi novel Dune, coauthored with Herbert's son Brian. Anderson also broke the Guinness World Record for "Largest Single-Author Signing," passing the previous records set by Gen. Colin Powell and Howard Stern. Anderson's Star Wars Jedi Academy trilogy became the three top-selling science fiction novels of 1994. He has also completed numerous other projects for Lucasfilm, including the 14-volumes in the New York Times bestselling Young Jedi Knights series. His three original Star Wars anthologies are the bestselling Science Fiction anthologies of all time. Anderson is the author of three hardcover novels based on the X-Files; all three became international bestsellers, the first of which reached #1 on the London Sunday Times. Ground Zero was voted "Best Science Fiction Novel of 1995" by the readers of SFX magazine. Ruins hit the New York Times bestseller list, the first X-Files novel ever to do so, and was voted "Best Science Fiction Novel of 1996. Anderson's thriller Ignition, written with Doug Beason, has sold to Universal Studios as a major motion picture. Anderson and Beason's novels have been nominated for the Nebula Award and the American Physics Society's "Forum" award. Their other novels include Virtual Destruction, Fallout, and Ill Wind, which has been optioned by ABC TV for a television movie or miniseries. Anderson's solo work has garnered wide critical acclaim: Climbing Olympus was voted the best paperback Science Fiction novel of 1995 by Locus magazine, Resurrection, Inc. was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award, and his novel Blindfold was the 1996 preliminary Nebula nominee. Anderson has written numerous bestselling comics, including Star Wars and Predator titles for Dark Horse, and X-Files for Topps. In 2015 he was a finalist for a Hugo Award in science-fiction for this title, The Dark Between the Stars.

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