Emancipation: The Making of the Black Lawyer, 1844-1944

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University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993 - Law - 703 pages
"Emancipation is an important and impressive work; one cannot read it without being inspired by the legal acumen, creativity, and resiliency these pioneer lawyers displayed. . . . It should be read by everyone interested in understanding the road African-Americans have traveled and the challenges that lie ahead."--From the Foreword, by Justice Thurgood Marshall
 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
ix
FOREWORD
xv
PREFACE
xxiii
INTRODUCTION
3
Prologue to Struggle The Formative Years 18291924
13
The Inheritance
15
Charles Hamilton Houston
24
Army Justice
35
Matters of Conscience
106
Struggling on Diverse Fronts The National Years 19351950
129
This Fight Is Not an Isolated Struggle
131
Protecting the Right to Work
156
Racism Must Go
176
In Any Fight Some Fall
194
CONCLUSIONS
213
APPENDIXES
227

Studying Law at Home and Abroad
46
Developing Cadres The Howard Years 19241935
57
Houston Houston
59
The Transformation of Howard University Law School
63
Dean Houstons School for Social Engineers
76
The Limitations of American Law
86
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
237
A NOTE ON SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
249
NOTES
251
INDEX OF NAMES PLACES AND SUBJECTS
299
INDEX OF PRINCIPAL CASES CITED
307
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