Growing California Native Plants

Front Cover
University of California Press, Dec 29, 1980 - Nature - 400 pages
This is the first comprehensive book to aid the gardener in making a start with native plants. It takes the gardener through the beginning steps of identifying native plants, evaluating them in relation to conventional garden materials, and learning detailed techniques of propagation and culture. Annuals, perennials (including ferns), bulbs, shrubs and trees are included—with about 350 species treated in detail, and many others included in charts and listings for quick reference.

A few California native plants have been in cultivation for a hundred years or so, but widespread consciousness of natives is relatively recent. It has arisen partly because of the recent drought, which natives survived more readily than exotics, and partly because of growing awareness that many natives have become rare or endangered, and may be preserved and perpetuated by cultivation for their ornamental qualities. The book is in full accord with the new trend in landscaping in which the environment, climate, and restricted water supplies are taken into account—not only for gardens but also for parks, roadside plantings, and other large-scale landscaping.

Because propagation and cultural methods for many native plants have never been recorded, the author spent years gathering information through correspondence. She has also had personal experience in growing natives for more than 30 years. The result is the first complete, practical, convenient guide for growing native plants. It will be essential for the experienced gardener and the beginner alike.
 

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Before I can share my opinion of this publication, I want to share now that I am not a professional critic, botanist, horticulture expert, academic or pretentious snob. What I am is a native California gardener who is obsessed with all aspects of our state's native flora. In so, I developed a healthy appetite for native plant literature (both in print and online) as it relates to plant propagation.
Though Ms. Schmidt's book was published in 1980, do not let its publication date make you feel you are missing something. Basically, when I am possession of seeds I want to sow, it is my first go-to reference publication (as it relates to seed treatment, growing medium, and sowing methods). Her writing style is laymen-readable, compact, to the point, and rich. Because I am focused on the propagation of particular CA natives, I can say from experience, that I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn (from scratch) how and which propagation methods to employ for the wild wild world of CA plants. ~R. Sullivan (lifeandleaf.com)
 

Selected pages

Contents

1 THE CASE FOR NATIVE PLANTS
1
2 GETTING STARTED
9
3 PROPAGATION OF NATIVE PLANTS
25
4 CULTURE OF NATIVE PLANTS
37
ANNUALS
46
WILDFLOWERS PERENNIALS
83
7 GROWING NATIVE BULBS
162
8 GROWING NATIVE SHRUBS
193
SHADEWATER SITUATION
316
HEDGES DIVIDERS OR WINDBREAKS
320
NATIVE PLANTS WITH COLORFUL FRUITS
323
NATIVE PLANTS FOR DESERT REGIONS
325
NATIVE PLANTS FOR COASTAL AREAS
327
PLANT COMMUNITIES
330
REFERENCES SOCIETIES AND PLANT SOURCES
333
PERIODICALS
337

9 GROWING NATIVE TREES
262
10 SUMMING UP
298
LISTS OF NATIVE PLANTS BY GARDEN REQUIREMENTS AND USES
301
SUNDRY SITUATION
302
SUNWATER SITUATION
309
SHADEDRY SITUATION
314
PLANT SOCIETIES AND BOTANIC GARDENS
338
SOURCES OF SEEDS PLANTS AND INFORMATION
339
ABBREVIATIONS
341
GLOSSARY
342
INDEX
351
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Majorie G. Schmidt has written a column on growing native plants for Fremontia, the journal of the California Native Plant Society, and has also contributed to many other horticultural journals.

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