Growing a Race: Nellie L. McClung and the Fiction of Eugenic Feminism

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Feb 6, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 182 pages
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Cecily Devereux reconsiders the extent to which McClung's enduring legacy of crusading for women's rights is founded on the ideas of British eugenicists such as Francis Galton and Caleb Saleeby and implicated in the passage of eugenical legislation in Canada. In a critical study of Painted Fires, the Pearlie Watson books, and several short stories, Devereux attempts to understand McClung's fiction in terms of its engagement with a politics of "race" and nation and constructions of specifically "racial" impurities that many women saw themselves as uniquely able to "cure."
 

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Contents

READING MATERNALISM IN MCCLUNGS FICTION THE CULTURE OF IMPERIAL MOTHERHOOD
51
EUGENIC PLOTS FEMINIST WORK AND THE RACIAL POISONS
75
EUGENIC FEMINISM AND INDIAN WORK
111
Epilogue
137
Notes
141
Bibliography
159
Index
171
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Page 23 - The idea which in all the length of my travels has been at once my fellow and my guide — a key wherewith to unlock the hidden things of strange new lands — is a conception, however imperfect, of the grandeur of our race, already girdling the earth, which it is destined, perhaps, eventually to overspread.

About the author (2006)

Department of English, University of Alberta.

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