Guatemala and Her People of To-day: Being an Account of the Land, Its History and Development; the People, Their Customs and Characteristics; to which are Added Chapters on British Honduras and the Republic of Honduras, with References to the Other Countries of Central America, Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica

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L. C. Page, 1909 - Central America - 307 pages
 

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Page 51 - And what is so rare as a day in June ? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then Heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays : Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten ; Every clod feels a stir of might. An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Page 28 - Though sluggards deem it but a foolish chase, And marvel men should quit their easy chair, The toilsome way, and long, long league to trace, Oh! there is sweetness in the mountain air, And Life, that bloated Ease can never hope to share.
Page 52 - The flush of life may well be seen Thrilling back over hills and valleys ; The cowslip startles in meadows green, The buttercup catches the sun in its chalice. And there's never a leaf nor a blade too mean To be some happy creature's palace.
Page 149 - World ! wrongly called the New — this clime was old When first the Spaniard came, in search of gold. Age after age its shadowy wings had spread, And man was born, and gathered to the dead ; Cities arose, ruled, dwindled to decay, Empires were formed, then darkly swept away : Race followed race, like cloud-shades o'er the field, The stranger still to strangers doomed to yield.
Page 298 - The location of these was strange and unexpected — beneath the pavement of courtyards and under the foundations of houses. They consist of small chambers of very excellent masonry, roofed sometimes by means of the horizontal arch, and sometimes by means of slabs of stone resting on the top of the vertical walls. In these tombs one, and sometimes two, interments had been made. The bodies had been laid at full length upon the floor. The cerements had long since...
Page 298 - The cerements had long since molded away, and the skeletons themselves were in a crumbling condition, and give little knowledge of the physical characteristics of the people ; but one fact of surpassing interest came to light concerning their private lives, namely, the custom of adorning the front teeth with gems inlaid in the enamel, and by filling. Although not all of the sets of teeth found...
Page 89 - Adelantado being entysed by the pleasantnes of the king's sister, Anacaona, determined to taste the serpentes. But when he felte the flesh thereof to be so delycate to his tongue, he fel to amayne without al feare. The which thyng his companions...
Page 298 - ... been treated in this way, there are enough to show that the practice was general, at least among the upper classes ; for all the tombs opened, from their associations with prominent houses, seem to have belonged to people of rank and fortune. The stone used in the inlaying was a bright green jadeite. A circular cavity about one-sixteenth of an inch in diameter was drilled in the enamel of each of the two front teeth of the upper row, and inlaid with a little disk of jadeite, cut to a perfect...
Page 297 - No regular burying-place has yet been found at Copan, but a number of isolated tombs have been explored. The location of these was strange and unexpected — beneath the pavements of court-yards and under the chambers of houses.
Page 223 - ... of the United States have been doing some effective work in this Republic. There have been several commercial travelers here studying the conditions and taking sample orders. Many others have been asking for information from this ConsulateGeneral, which has been able to give valuable information. If this field is properly worked and sufficiently long credit is given, practically nothing but American goods need be found in the markets of Guatemala, for they are generally conceded to be the best....

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