Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, Oct 22, 2007 - Computers - 188 pages
0 Reviews

Based on Kuhlthau's six stage Information Search Process, the authors present a convincing argument for recasting Guided Inquiry as a dynamic, innovative way of developing information literacy. Part I discusses the theory and rationale behind adopting a Guided Inquiry approach, as the authors elucidate the expertise, roles, and responsibilities of each member of the instructional team. Part II presents the model in terms of its component parts. PreK-12.

Noted researcher Kuhlthau has teamed up with a curriculum specialist and museum educator to create this foundational text on Guided Inquiry, a dynamic, integrated approach to teaching curriculum content, information literacy, and strategies for learning. Grounded in Kuhlthau's Information Search Process from her classic text Seeking Meaning and built on solid professional practice, this innovative team approach inspires students to gain deeper understandings and higher order thinking using the rich resources of the school library, the community and the wider world. This book provides the vital tools for educators to create collaborative environments where students experience school learning and real life meshed in integral ways—learning in the 21st century.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - davidloertscher - LibraryThing

Stop everything you are doing, get a copy of this book, an read it cover to covwer in one sitting. Kuhlthau joins forces with a curriculum expert an a museum professional to propose a solid initiative ... Read full review

Contents

What Is It Whats New Why Now?
1
Illustration 11 Extending KWL Questions for Guided Inquiry
4
Illustration 12 What Guided Inquiry Is Not and Is
6
Illustration 14 Benefits for Teachers
7
Illustration 16 Benefits for Administrators
8
Illustration 18 Five Kinds of Learning in the Inquiry Process
9
Chapter 2The Theory and Research Basis for Guided Inquiry
13
Illustration 21 Deweys Phases of Reflective Thinking
15
Illustration 52 Resources Outside the School
66
Chapter 6Information Literacy Through Guided Inquiry
77
Illustration 61 Information Literacy Concepts
80
Illustration 63 Concepts for Evaluating
85
Illustration 64 Concepts for Using
87
Chapter 7Meeting Content Area Curricular Standards Through Guided Inquiry
93
Illustration 71 Common Themes in Subject Area Standards
94
Chapter 8Assessment in Guided Inquiry
111

Illustration 22 Model of the Information Search Process
19
Illustration 23 Progression of Kuhlthaus Information Search Process
21
Illustration 24 Six Principles of Guided Inquiry
25
Chapter 3Connecting to the Students World
29
Illustration 31 Third Space in Guided Inquiry
32
Illustration 32 Establishing a Community of Learners
36
Illustration 33 Advantages of Small Flexible Groups
37
Illustration 34 Inquiry Circle Jobs
43
Chapter 4The Guided Inquiry Team
47
Illustration 41 Implementation Inhibitors
51
Illustration 42 Implementation Enablers
52
Illustration 43 Roles of the School Librarian
57
Illustration 44 The Guided Inquiry Team
60
Chapter 5Resources for a Rich Learning Environment
61
Illustration 51 Resources in the School Library
64
Illustration 81 Five Kinds of Learning in the Inquiry Process
112
Illustration 82 Librarian Responses on Student Learning
114
Illustration 83 Indicators of Learning as Applied by Librarians
115
Illustration 84 Observation Form for Guided Inquiry
118
Illustration 85 Timeline Reflection on My Inquiry Process
121
Illustration 86 Types of Portfolio Entries for Guided Inquiry
122
Illustration 87 Analyzing SLIM Reflection Tasks
130
Chapter 9Interventions for Guiding Inquiry
133
Illustration 91 Intervention Questions for Basic Inquiry Abilities
136
Illustration 92 Intervention Strategies for Guided Inquiry
137
Illustration 93 Interventions for Learning in the Inquiry Process
141
Chapter 10Meeting the Challenge of the 21stCentury School
147
References
151
Index
157
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Carol C. Kuhlthau is professor emerita of library and information science at Rutgers University, where she directed the graduate program in school librarianship that has been rated number one in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

Leslie K. Maniotes, NBCT, MEd, PhD, is a teacher effectiveness coach in Denver Public Schools, a curriculum and literacy specialist, and a national consultant on inquiry learning and instructional design.

Ann K. Caspari is senior museum educator for the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center.

Bibliographic information