H.M.S. Surprise, Volume 5

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 1996 - Aubrey, Jack (Fictitious character) - 388 pages
20 Reviews
Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey-Maturin tales are widely acknowledged to be the greatest series of historical novels ever written. H.M.S. Surprise follows the variable fortunes of Captain Jack Aubrey's career in Nelson's navy as he attempts to hold his ground against admirals, colleagues and the enemy, accepting a mission to convey a British ambassador to the East Indies. The voyage takes him and his friend Stephen Maturin to the strange sights and smells of the Indian sub-continent, and through the archipelago of spice islands where the French have a near-overwhelming superiority. Rarely has a novel managed to convey more vividly the fragility of a sailing ship in a wild sea. Rarely has a historical novelist combined action and lyricism of style in the way that O' Brian does. His superb sense of place, brilliant characterisation, and a vigour and joy of writing lift O'Brian above any but the most exalted of comparisons.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - malcrf - LibraryThing

Typical O'Brian. Wonderful language, details and characterisation, masterful battle scene and completely evocative of the time and circumstances. Just a little slow in places, and not quite the page-turner of other Aubrey/Maturin volumes. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DarthDeverell - LibraryThing

H.M.S. Surprise begins almost immediately after Post Captain ended, with Captain Jack Aubrey's famous luck again failing him on land as his hard-won fortune slips away from him. In Patrick O'Brian's ... Read full review

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About the author (1996)

Patrick O'Brian, until his death in 2000, was one of our greatest contemporary novelists. He is the author of the acclaimed Aubrey-Maturin tales and the biographer of Joseph Banks and Picasso. He is the author of many other books including Testimonies, and his Collected Short Stories. In 1995 he was the first recipient of the Heywood Hill Prize for a lifetime's contribution to literature. In the same year he was awarded the CBE. In 1997 he received an honorary doctorate of letters from Trinity College, Dublin. He lived for many years in South West France and he died in Dublin in January 2000.

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