Hadamard Matrices and Their Applications

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 2007 - Mathematics - 263 pages
1 Review

In Hadamard Matrices and Their Applications, K. J. Horadam provides the first unified account of cocyclic Hadamard matrices and their applications in signal and data processing. This original work is based on the development of an algebraic link between Hadamard matrices and the cohomology of finite groups that was discovered fifteen years ago. The book translates physical applications into terms a pure mathematician will appreciate, and theoretical structures into ones an applied mathematician, computer scientist, or communications engineer can adapt and use.

The first half of the book explains the state of our knowledge of Hadamard matrices and two important generalizations: matrices with group entries and multidimensional Hadamard arrays. It focuses on their applications in engineering and computer science, as signal transforms, spreading sequences, error-correcting codes, and cryptographic primitives.

The book's second half presents the new results in cocyclic Hadamard matrices and their applications. Full expression of this theory has been realized only recently, in the Five-fold Constellation. This identifies cocyclic generalized Hadamard matrices with particular "stars" in four other areas of mathematics and engineering: group cohomology, incidence structures, combinatorics, and signal correlation.

Pointing the way to possible new developments in a field ripe for further research, this book formulates and discusses ninety open questions.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

In mathematics, a Hadamard matrix, named after the French mathematician Jacques Hadamard, is a square matrix whose entries are either +1 or −1 and whose rows are mutually orthogonal. In geometric terms, this means that every two different rows in a Hadamard matrix represent two perpendicular vectors, while in combinatorial terms, it means that every two different rows have matching entries in exactly half of their columns and mismatched entries in the remaining columns. It is a consequence of this definition that the corresponding properties hold for columns as well as rows. The n-dimensional parallelotope spanned by the rows of an n◊n Hadamard matrix has the maximum possible n-dimensional volume among parallelotopes spanned by vectors whose entries are bounded in absolute value by 1. Equivalently, a Hadamard matrix has maximal determinant among matrices with entries of absolute value less than or equal to 1 and so, is an extremal solution of Hadamard's maximal determinant problem
• Olivia MFSK – an amateur-radio digital protocol designed to work in difficult (low signal-to-noise ratio plus multipath propagation) conditions on shortwave bands.
• Balanced Repeated Replication (BRR) – a technique used by statisticians to estimate the variance of a statistical estimator.
• Coded aperture spectrometry – an instrument for measuring the spectrum of light. The mask element used in coded aperture spectrometers is often a variant of a Hadamard matrix.
• Feedback Delay Networks – Digital reverberation devices which use Hadamard matrices to blend sample values
• Plackett–Burman design of experiments for investigating the dependence of some measured quantity on a number of independent variables.
• Robust parameter designs for investigating noise factor impacts on responses
• Three Applications in Signal Processing, Coding and Cryptography Practical application of Hadamard matrices
• Sylvester's construction
• Examples of Hadamard matrices were actually first constructed by James Joseph Sylvester in 1867. Let H be a Hadamard matrix of order n. Then the partitioned matrix

• is a Hadamard matrix of order 2n. This observation can be applied repeatedly and leads to the following sequence of matrices, also called Walsh matrices.


• and

• for , where denotes the Kronecker product.
• In this manner, Sylvester constructed Hadamard matrices of order 2k for every non-negative integer k.[1]
• Sylvester's matrices have a number of special properties. They are symmetric and, when k ≥ 1, have trace zero. The elements in the first column and the first row are all positive. The elements in all the other rows and columns are evenly divided between positive and negative. Sylvester matrices are closely connected with Walsh functions.
Hadamard Matrices and Their Applications, K. J. Horadam provides the first unified account of cocyclic Hadamard matrices and their applications in signal and data processing. This original work is based on the development of an algebraic link between Hadamard matrices and the cohomology of finite groups that was discovered fifteen years ago. The book translates physical applications into terms a pure mathematician will appreciate, and theoretical structures into ones an applied mathematician, computer scientist, or communications engineer can adapt and use. The first half of the book explains the state of our knowledge of Hadamard matrices and two important generalizations: matrices with group entries and multidimensional Hadamard arrays. It focuses on their applications in engineering and computer science, as signal transforms, spreading sequences, error-correcting codes, and cryptographic primitives. The book's second half presents the new results in cocyclic Hadamard matrices and their applications. Full expression of this theory has been realized only recently, in the Five-fold Constellation. This identifies cocyclic generalized Hadamard matrices with particular "stars" in four other areas of mathematics
 

Other editions - View all

References to this book

About the author (2007)

K. J. Horadam is Professor of Mathematics and leads the Information Theory and Security Research Group at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia.

Bibliographic information