Hadrian the Seventh

Front Cover
New York Review of Books, 2001 - Fiction - 401 pages
1 Review
One day George Arthur Rose, hack writer and minor priest, discovers that he has been picked to be Pope. He is hardly surprised and not in the least daunted. "The previous English pontiff was Hadrian the Fourth," he declares. "The present English pontiff is Hadrian the Seventh. It pleases Us; and so, by Our own impulse, We command."Hadrian is conceived in the image of his creator, Fr. Rolfe, whose aristocratic pretensions (he called himself Baron Corvo), religious obsession, and anarchic and self-aggrandizing sensibility have made him known as one of the great English eccentrics. Fr. Rolfe endured a lifetime of indignities and disappointments. However, in the hilarious and touching pages of this, his finest novel, he triumphs.
 

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Hadrian the Seventh

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Make that Pope Hadrian the Seventh. Rolfe offers up a British pontiff who wants to redesign the crucifix, redecorate the Vatican, and canonize capriciously. Hadrian is a little-disguised version of ... Read full review

Review: Hadrian the Seventh

User Review  - Austin - Goodreads

In the middle of this. Tough one. It started off mean and funny and kinda desperate, but now it's getting bogged down in Catholic jargon and the minutiae of Papal authority. Yeesh. hard to read more ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
60
Section 3
63
Section 4
78
Section 5
91
Section 6
106
Section 7
112
Section 8
121
Section 16
252
Section 17
258
Section 18
271
Section 19
281
Section 20
291
Section 21
300
Section 22
313
Section 23
319

Section 9
138
Section 10
154
Section 11
169
Section 12
176
Section 13
193
Section 14
228
Section 15
235
Section 24
336
Section 25
346
Section 26
351
Section 27
360
Section 28
386
Section 29
392
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Fr. Rolfe (1860-1913) also known as Frederick Rolfe and Baron Corvo, converted to Catholicism when he was twenty-six and attempted to enter the priesthood. After he was ejected from the seminary, he pledged himself to twenty years of celibacy and proceeded to write several semi-autobiographical novels that were simultaneously pious and irreverent. He lived alternately extravagantly and in squalor, depending on his means at the time, and died bitter and poor in Venice. 

Alexander Theroux is an American novelist, poet, and essayist. His most recent novel is Laura Warholic.
 

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