Hagar: The Singing Maiden, with Other Stories and Rhymes

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Walton, 1881 - Manners and customs - 288 pages
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Page 175 - O'er wandering brooks and springs unseen, Or columbines, in purple dressed, Nod o'er the ground-bird's hidden nest. Thou waitest late and com'st alone, When woods are bare and birds are flown, And frosts and shortening days portend The aged year is near his end. Then doth thy sweet and quiet eye Look through its fringes to the sky, Blue — blue — as if that sky let fall A flower from its cerulean wall. I would that thus, when I shall see The hour of death draw near to me, Hope, blossoming within...
Page 230 - Here are sweet peas, on tip-toe for a flight: With wings of gentle flush o'er delicate white, And taper fingers catching at all things, To bind them all about with tiny rings.
Page 88 - ... we owe the beauty of our gardens, the sweetness of our fields. To them flowers are indebted for their scent and colour ; nay, for their very existence, in its present form. Not only have the present shape and outlines, the brilliant colours, the sweet scent and the honey of flowers, been gradually developed through the unconscious selection exercised by insects ; but the very arrangement of the colours, the circular bands and radiating lines, the form, size and position of the petals, the relative...
Page 88 - For example, we are told that to bees and other insects "we owe the beauty of our gardens, the sweetness of our fields. To them flowers are indebted for their scent and colour; nay, for their very existence, in its present form. Not only have the present shape and outlines, the brilliant colours, the sweet scent and the honey of flowers, been gradually developed through the unconscious selection exercised by insects...
Page 225 - Why pluck'st thou me?" Then, as the dark blood trickled down its side, These words it added: "Wherefore tear'st me thus? Is there no touch of mercy in thy breast? Men once were we, that now are rooted here. Thy hand might well have spared us, had we been The souls of serpents.
Page 161 - My child, we must soon part to meet no more this side of the grave. You have ever said that you would not die a slave; that you would be a freeman. Now try to get your liberty! You will soon have no one to look after but yourself!
Page 167 - A horseman waves his hat from the road in greeting to the assembly, and the boys give a small hurrah. Dolly's face grows bright, then clouds over. Only Sir Mark Tufton. Lill is leading a party, striving all she can to put some animation into them. " Come, then—" " Lady Queen Anne, she sits in the sun, As fair as a lily, as brown as a bun,
Page 86 - ... the wise Author of nature would not have created even a hair in vain." But in this same year, 1787, a greater man than Sprengel began his work upon the same subject. The German and the Englishman, unknown to each other, caught the thread of nature's purpose, and began to unravel her close-woven fabric. The one interrogated nature in the field, the other courted her in...
Page 88 - Mr. Darwin himself, however, was, I believe, the first to show that, if a flower be fertilised by pollen from a different plant, the seedlings so produced are much stronger than if the plant be fertilised by its own pollen. I have had the advantage of seeing several of these experiments, and the difference is certainly most striking. For instance, six crossed and six self-fertilised seeds of...
Page 161 - Be near me, mother, be thy spirit near me. Wherever thou may'st be ; In hours like this bend near that I may hear thee, And know that thou art free ; ,. Summoned at length from bondage, toil and pain, To God's free world, a world without a chain ! APPENDIX.

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