Hair!: Mankind's Historic Quest to End Baldness

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Random House Publishing Group, Apr 3, 2001 - Health & Fitness - 192 pages
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Hair! Mankind's Historic Quest to End Baldness is a social history of one of humanity's most irksome problems: male pattern baldness.

Throughout the centuries, Man (not his real name) has tried everything to hide, treat and repair baldness, as well as a host of nostrums designed to coax hair growth from the scalp (or, at least, money from the wallets of unsuspecting baldies). Yet we stand on the brink of a truly historic epoch: Two drugs are now federally approved remedies for baldness and more are on the way while surgical techniques continue to improve, and even hairpieces are becoming acceptable again. Will baldness, the stigma it carries, and the profound psychological toll it takes on men soon be things of the past? Will bald men someday be electable? Are these even rhetorical questions?

Gersh Kuntzman takes you from the laboratories of Merck, maker of Propecia, to the operating rooms of the nation's best hair-transplant surgeons, to the rug men working on the cutting edge of artificial hair design. Hair! covers baldness like nothing before.

 

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Hair!: Mankind's Historic Quest to End Baldness

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From Egypt and ancient Rome right up to the snake-oil concoctions of the last century, Kuntzman (a New York journalist) relates a history "of failed promises, fake cures, misplaced hopes and bitter ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page Dedication Introduction
The Psychology of Baldness
The Root of All Evil the Evil of All Roots
The SnakeOil
The Rug
From HairinaCan to Sheep Protein in a Bottle
The Transplantation of Hair
Rogaine and Propecia
The Ralph Nader of Hair
On the Front Lines for a Cure for Baldness
Bald Men Acting
Acknowledgments Web Resources Directory
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Gersh Kuntzman has been a New York newspaperman for more than a decade, most recently as a reporter and columnist for The New York Post. Kuntzman’s weekly column, MetroGnome, roots out the quirky underside of New York life.

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