Hakluytus Posthumus, Or, Purchas His Pilgrimes: Contayning a History of the World in Sea Voyages and Lande Travells by Englishmen and Others, Issue 30

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J. MacLehose and Sons, 1906 - Voyages and travels
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Page 81 - With a general consent of all our company, it was ordained that there should be a palmer or ferula which should be in the keeping of him who was taken with an oath ; and that he who had the palmer should give to every...
Page 545 - ... to seeke another treasure like that of Atabalipa, lord of Peru, was not contented with a good countrie, nor with pearles, though many of them were worth their weight in gold. And if the countrie had...
Page 128 - Straites, a storme tooke him first at North-west, and after vered about to the South-west, which continued with him many dayes, with that extremitie, that he could not open any Sayle, and that at the end of the storme, he found himselfe in fiftie degrees, which was sufficient testimony and proofe, that he was beaten round about the Straites...
Page 524 - Governour, with an hundred men in the brigantines, lighted upon a towne, which he found without people, because, that assoone as the Christians had sight of land, they were descried, and saw along the coast many smokes, which the Indians had made to give advice the one to the other. The next day Luys de Moscoso, master of the campe, set the men in order, the horsemen in three squadrons, — the vantgard, the batallion, and the rerewarde : and so they marched that day, and the day following, compassing...
Page 99 - Portingall ship, and gave her chase, and comming within hayling of her, shee reiidred her selfe without any resistance ; shee was of an hundred tuns, bound for Angola, to load negroes, to be carried and sold in the river of Plate. It is a trade of great profit, and much used, for that the negroes are carried from the head of the river of Plate, to Potosi, to labour in the mynes.
Page 76 - Upon which all the sea became so replenished with several sorts of jellies, and forms of serpents, adders, and snakes, as seemed wonderful : some green, some black, some yellow, some white, some of divers colours ; and many of them had life ; and some there were a yard and a half, and two yards long : which had I not seen, I could hardly have believed. And hereof are witnesses all the company of the ships which were then present ; so that hardly a man could draw a bucket of water clear of some corruption.
Page 85 - Creator, who for their safetie and helpe, hath given them extraordinary manner of fynnes, which serve in stead of wings, like those of the batt or rere-mouse; of such a delicate skinne, interlaced with small bones so curiously, as may well cause admiration in the beholders. They are like unto pilchards in colour, and making ; saving that they are somewhat rounder, and (for the most part) bigger. They flie best with a side wind, but longer then their wings be wett they cannot sustaine the waight of...
Page 105 - I have sorrowed for many times since, for that it had likelihood to be an excellent country. It hath great rivers of fresh waters ; for the out-shoot of them colours the sea in many places, as we ran alongst it. It is not mountaynous, but much of the disposition of England, and as temperate. The things we noted principally on the coast, are these following ; the westermost...
Page 115 - Another manner is used with double plankes, as thicke without as within, after the manner of furring ; which is little better then that with lead ; for, besides his waight, it dureth little, because the worme in small time passeth through the one and the other.
Page 116 - ... finger thicke of hayre, such as the whitelymers use, and so nayle it on, the nayles not above a spanne distance one from another ; the thicker they are driven, the better. Some hold opinion that the tarre killeth the worme ; others, that the worme passing the sheathing, and seeking a way through, the hayre and the tarre so involve him that he is choked therewith; which me thinkes is most probable...

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