Hakuin on Kensho: The Four Ways of Knowing

Front Cover
Shambhala Publications, 2006 - Religion - 129 pages
0 Reviews
Kensho is the Zen experience of waking up to one’s own true nature—of understanding oneself to be not different from the Buddha-nature that pervades all existence. The Japanese Zen Master Hakuin (1689–1769) considered the experience to be essential. In his autobiography he says: “Anyone who would call himself a member of the Zen family must first achieve kensho-realization of the Buddha’s way. If a person who has not achieved kensho says he is a follower of Zen, he is an outrageous fraud. A swindler pure and simple.”

Hakuin’s short text on kensho, “Four Ways of Knowing of an Awakened Person,” is a little-known Zen classic. The “four ways” he describes include the way of knowing of the Great Perfect Mirror, the way of knowing equality, the way of knowing by differentiation, and the way of the perfection of action. Rather than simply being methods for “checking” for enlightenment in oneself, these ways ultimately exemplify Zen practice. Albert Low has provided careful, line-by-line commentary for the text that illuminates its profound wisdom and makes it an inspiration for deeper spiritual practice.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IX
17
XI
19
XII
21
XIII
22
XIV
24
XV
25
XVI
28
XVII
29
XXVIII
41
XXIX
49
XXX
58
XXXI
62
XXXII
63
XXXIII
65
XXXIV
81
XXXV
91

XX
30
XXIII
31
XXIV
32
XXV
33
XXVI
35
XXVII
37
XXXVI
103
XXXVII
114
XXXVIII
121
XXXIX
125
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Albert Low holds degrees in philosophy and psychology, and was for many years a management consultant, lecturing widely on organizational dynamics. He studied Zen under Roshi Philip Kapleau, author of The Three Pillars of Zen, receiving transmission as a teacher in 1986. He is currently director and guiding teacher of the Montreal Zen Centre. He is the author of several books, including Zen and Creative Management and The Iron Cow of Zen.

Bibliographic information