Half-hours with the Microscope: Being a Popular Guide to the Use of the Microscope as a Means of Amusement and Instruction

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Robert Hardwicke, 1863 - Microscopes - 106 pages
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Page 46 - Vorl.icellae are contracted together, so that a large mass, expanding over the whole field of the microscope, suddenly disappears, and, ' like the baseless fabric of a vision leaves not a wreck behind.
Page 46 - A little patience, however, and the fearful creatures will once more be seen to expand themselves in all their beauty. The mouth of their little cup is surrounded by cilia, which are inconstant movement; and when examined minutely, they will be found to possess two apertures, through one of which currents of water pass into the body, and from the other pass out. Not unfrequently the cup breaks off its stalk. It then contracts its mouth, and proceeds to roll about free in the water. Many other curious...
Page 45 - It can also contract its tentacles over particles of starch and animalcules, and press them into the fleshy substance in its centre. This is undoubtedly an animal, but it has no mouth or stomach. A large number of such forms present themselves under the Microscope. Some of them are covered with an external envelope, which they make artificially, by attaching small stones and other substances to their external surface, as in the case of the Difflugiai (Fig.
Page 45 - One of the most common animalcules met with in fresh water, and whose presence can easily be insured by steeping a few stalks of hay in a glass of water, is the bell-shaped animalcule. These animalcules, which are called Vorticella, are of, various sizes. Some are so large that their presence can easily be detected by the naked eye, whilst others require the highest powers of the Microscope. They are all distinguished by having a little cup-shaped body, which is placed upon a long stalk, figured...
Page 45 - Some are so large that their presence can easily be detected by the naked eye, whilst others require the highest powers of the microscope. They are all distinguished by having a little cup-shaped body, which is placed upon a long stalk. The stalk has the peculiar power of contracting in a spiral manner, which the creature does when anything disturbs it in the slightest manner. In some species these stalks are branched, so that hundreds of these creatures are found on a single stem, forming an exceedingly...
Page 74 - We will suppose that the beginner, having purchased the necessary materials, is about to make his first attempt. Let him attend to the following advice, and he will escape many failures. " He must bring to his work a mind cool and collected ; hands clean and free from grease. Let him place everything he may require close at hand, or within his reach. A stock of clean slides and covers must always be ready for use. He must keep his needles, scissors, and scalpels scrupulously clean. An ingenious youth...
Page 2 - No doubt we can see things better and more clearly the closer we can bring our eyes to them. Thus, if we look at a printed bill from the opposite side of a street, we there see only the words printed in large letters ; go a little nearer, and we see the smaller letters ; and, as we approach, we can read it all ; till, at last, we get to a point where we can see no better by coming closer. But suppose all the words were printed in very tiny letters, so small that...
Page 45 - We shall meet again with forms resembling these when we take our microscope to the sea.side. "One of the most common animalcules met with in fresh water, and whose presence can easily be ensured by steeping a few stalks of hay in a glass of water, is the bell-shaped animalcule. These animalcules, which are called Forticella,&K of various sizes.
Page 44 - ... and change their form constantly. As they press themselves slowly along, small portions of vegetable matter, or occasionally a diatom, mix apparently with their substance. Cells are produced in their interior, which bud off from the parent, and lead the same life. These creatures are called amaebas ; and though they have no mouth or stomach, they are referred to the animal kingdom.
Page 45 - PI. 1). This curious creature has the power, apparently, of suddenly contracting its tentacles, and leaping about in the water. It can also contract its tentacles over particles of starch and animalcules, and press them into the fleshy substance in its centre. This is undoubtedly an animal, but it has no mouth or stomach. A large number of such forms present themselves under the Microscope. Some of them are covered with an external envelope, which they make artificially, by attaching...

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