Hand-book of a Collection of Chinese Porcelains

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Page 15 - Many other notices from travellers of the 14th and loth centuries might be cited. It was probably through Egypt that it reached Europe ; at any rate a present of porcelain vases was sent by the Sultan of Egypt in 1487 to Lorenzo de' Medici. To the Portuguese is no doubt due the first direct importation of Chinese wares into Europe, in which they were followed by the various India Companies of Holland, England, France, Sweden, &c.
Page 12 - The troubles of the later emperors of the Ming dynasty, who succeeded one another rapidly, and were constantly at war with the Tartars, probably caused the...
Page 14 - Keen-lung (1736-1795) reigned for 60 years, when he abdicated. A large quantity of fine china was made during his long reign, much of it exhibiting very rich and minute decoration. Under his successors the manufacture appears again to have diminished in excellence, and the destruction caused by the rebellion of the Tai-pings not only greatly interfered with the extent of production, but caused the downfall of the most celebrated of the fabrics, that of King-te-chin. As...
Page 14 - As, however, we have already said, the native accounts do not furnish much information that can be rendered available ; but they show very clearly that at all times the porcelain makers were in the habit of copying the works of their predecessors, and instances are given where they have even succeeded in imposing upon the best judges of their own country. The places at which manufactories of porcelain have existed or still exist in China are very...
Page 1 - Ce'ramiques," by A. Brongniart, 1844. The only work which affords any native evidence on the history of Chinese porcelain, and the various places at which it has been manufactured, is the " Histoire de la fabrication de la Porcelaine chinoise," translated from the Chinese by M.
Page 21 - ... color. Objects are also made surrounded by a shell of open-work, forming one with the interior, which is solid.* * Imitated at Sevres and other places. I have also seen porcelain decorated with Chinese and Tartar female figures in the most exquisite manner, resembling enamels. If no other glaze is used than that made from white stones, crackle ware is produced. The glaze gives a grayish white color by itself, but it will produce the same effect on pieces which have been colored. Gold is applied...
Page 21 - The red souffle is made by using a little tube, one end of which is covered with a very fine gauze. This end is gently dipped into the prepared color, the artist approaches it to the object, and blows through the other end; this is repeated until the desired effect is produced. Such objects are very rare and highly esteemed. Black porcelain is also esteemed, and resembles our burning mirrors. Decoration in gold upon the black enriches the color. Objects are...
Page 21 - This end is gently dipped into the prepared color ; the artist brings it near the object, and blows through the other end; this is repeated until the desired effect is produced. " Such objects are very rare and highly esteemed. Black porcelain is also esteemed, and resembles our burning mirrors. Decoration in gold upon the black enriches the color. Objects are also made surrounded by a shell of open-work, forming one solid piece with the inner one.
Page 22 - Great skill is required in glazing very thin porcelain. The interior is first sprinkled with the glaze and allowed to dry, after which the outside is dipped into it. The bottom is left solid during this operation; it is then hollowed out on the wheel.
Page 19 - The town is situated in a plain surrounded by high mountains; the one to the east, against which the town is built, is outwardly in form of a semicircle; and from the two adjacent mountains issue two rivers which unite. One is small, the other very large, and their confluence forms a magnificent port over three miles in length...

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