Hand-book of Chemistry, Volume 5

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Cavendish Society, 1851 - Chemistry
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Page 497 - SOCIETY was instituted for the promotion of Chemistry and its allied sciences, by the diffusion of the literature of these subjects. The Society effects its object by the translation of recent works and papers of merit ; by the publication of valuable original works which would not otherwise be printed, from the slender chance of their meeting with a remunerative sale ; and by the occasional...
Page 498 - Society are conducted by the Council, who, with other officers, are elected by ballot at a General Meeting of the Society held on the 1st of March of each year. Members are admitted on application to the General or Local Secretaries, and contribute an Annual Subscription of one guinea...
Page 124 - ... by the 1 part of sngar-of-lead and converted into basic acetate, and then precipitated from the solution by combining with carbonic acid. (Pelouze.) 2. Older Method of Preparation. — By exposing plates of lead to the vapours of acetic acid, and at the same time to air loaded with carbonic acid. The predisposing affinity of the acetic acid for the lead-oxide induces the formation of that compound at the expense of the air ; the carbonic acid precipitates a portion of the lead-oxide from the...
Page 107 - Zinc has markedly different properties at different temperatures. At ordinary temperatures it is quite brittle; at 100-150 it can be rolled out in sheets, but above 200 it becomes brittle again. In dry air it does not change. When heated in the air it takes fire, and burns with a bluish flame, forming zinc oxide.
Page 466 - Copper alloyed with 0'15 per cent, of arsenic becomes somewhat brittle when cold, and very brittle at a red heat.
Page 313 - ... separated in the form of the double salts with lead tetrachloride; the latter is decomposed with water, the solution treated with a slight excess of ammonium sulphide to free it from lead, and the filtrate evaporated to dryness; the mixed chlorides of caesium and rubidium are dissolved in concentrated nitric acid, the solution evaporated to dryness, the residue dissolved in water, excess of oxalic acid added, and the mixture again evaporated to dryness, and heated in a platinum crucible until...
Page 132 - A finely divided mixture of 100 parts of galena and 84 of lead heated for a quarter of an hour in a well-closed charcoal crucible...
Page 476 - Mosaic gold. — Prepared by fusing equal weights of copper and zinc in a crucible at the lowest possible temperature, stirring constantly, and then adding a further quantity of zinc in small portions, till the colour of the fused mixture, after passing through the various shades of brass-yellow, purple-red, and violet, has become perfeetlv white.
Page 486 - ... but no sublimate. Heated on charcoal before the blowpipe, it acquires a dark tarnish, then becomes black, and red on cooling. At a somewhat stronger heat, it melts to a brittle globule, which becomes magnetic after sufficient blowing, and appears greyishred on the fractured surface. When roasted for a considerable time, and then treated with a small quantity of borax, it yields a button of copper, and if fused with carbonate of sodium after the sulphur is completely expelled, it yields separate...
Page 356 - ... spar, the slag thrown away, and the fused product ground to powder, and roasted in a reverberatory furnace till no more fumes of arsenic are given off. The roasted product then dissolves almost completely in hydrochloric acid. The solution is diluted with water, mixed with chloride of lime to convert the iron into sesqui oxide, and with milk of lime to precipitate that oxide together...

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