Hand Book of Library Organization

Front Cover
publisher not identified, 1902 - Library administration - 79 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 83 - ... annually on all the taxable property in the city, such tax to be levied and collected in like manner with other general taxes of said city, and to be known as the
Page 84 - ... officers as they may deem necessary. They shall make and adopt such by-laws, rules and regulations for their own guidance and for the government of the library and reading room as may be expedient, not inconsistent with this act. They shall have the exclusive control of the expenditure of all moneys collected to the credit of the library fund...
Page 84 - Said directors shall, immediately after appointment, meet and organize, by the election of one of their number president, and by the election of such other officers as they may deem necessary. They shall make and adopt such by-laws, rules, and regulations for their own guidance and for the government of the library and reading room, as may be expedient, not inconsistent with this act.
Page 84 - ... shall have power to appoint a suitable librarian and necessary assistants, and fix their compensation, and shall also have power to remove such appointees ; and shall, in general, carry out the spirit and intent of this act, in establishing and maintaining a public library and reading room.
Page 83 - That the common council of each incorporated city of this state shall have power to establish and maintain a public library and reading room for the use and benefit of the inhabitants of such city...
Page 84 - ... and of the supervision, care, and custody of the grounds, rooms, or buildings, constructed, leased, or set apart for that purpose. Provided, That all moneys received for such library shall be deposited in the treasury of said city to the credit of the library fund...
Page 32 - This is the real menace under which we cower in this age of change. " It is the office of the historian to keep the world's memory alive. There will never be an end of the writing of history. Some one has truly said, each generation must write all past history afresh, from its own changing standpoint. But that this may continue, and with increasing advantage, there must never be an end of accumulating historical material; each generation must accumulate its own, for the benefit of its sucr-.essor.
Page 33 - In olden times, enterprises of this character were left to the chance of individual initiative. To-day, they may be better, more systematically, done by public librarians. It is not possible, nor is it advisable, for every public library to engage in a task of this character, upon any extended scale. It is sufficient that a few great libraries undertake missions of this sort, libraries, perhaps, in widely-separated cities; but certain it is, that each public library can and should make collections...
Page 32 - All librarians who have in charge such treasures are aware of the general popular interest in old pamphlets, newspaper files, and the odds and ends of printed matter issued in ephemeral form, provided they are old enough to have ceased to be commonplace. That with which we are all familiar is commonplace, and generally held in slight value; but the commonplaces of one generation are the treasured relics of the next. It is not mere idle curiosity, this interest of ours in the things with which our...
Page 17 - I am inclined to take the position that no argument for open shelves is necessary — that the burden of proof rests with those who would restrict. We have in the public library the people's books, paid for by their money, and deposited in libraries for their use. This use should not be restricted in any way which is not clearly necessary to guard the people's interests.

Bibliographic information