Hand-book to Accompany the Synoptic Table of Measures and Weights of the Metric System

Front Cover
W. & A.K. Johnston, 1864 - Metric system - 18 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 18 - French, with the exception perhaps of the division of the circle, where the number 600, as mentioned above, might be conveniently substituted for 400. It would not be necessary to adopt their names, which might not assort very well with the sounds that compose the languages of other nations. But the metre, by whatever name it may be called, ought to be adopted as the unit of length, and all the other measures of linear extension derived from it by decimal multiplication and division.
Page 18 - The system adopted by the French, if not absolutely the best, is so very near it, that the difference is of no account. In one point it is very unexceptionable. It involves nothing that savours of the peculiarities of any country, insomuch as the commissioners observe that, if all the history which we have been considering were forgotten, and the results of the operations only preserved, it would be impossible to tell with what nation this system had originated.
Page 17 - ... expressing our wishes that the uniformity of measures and of weights were introduced into our own, and into every other civilized country. The difficulty is not so great as we are apt to think, when we consider the matter at a distance ; and to effect it requires, in reality, nothing but for the legislature to say, it shall be done. As to the standard to be adopted, though we think the pendulum would have afforded the most convenient ; yet when one has been actually fixed on and determined, that...
Page 17 - ... whatever causes they arise, the repetition of operations, such as those we are now treating of, is what alone can be expected to throw new light upon the subject. Additional experiments on the attraction of mountains would probably tend to the same object, and might lead to other valuable conclusions. We cannot finish our account of these scientific operations, without expressing our wishes that the uniformity of measures and of weights were introduced into our own, and into every other civilized...
Page 17 - ... probably tend to the same object, and might lead to other valuable conclusions. We cannot finish our account of these scientific operations, without expressing our wishes that the uniformity of measures and of weights were introduced into our own, and into every other civilized country. The difficulty is not so great as we are apt to think, when we consider the matter at a distance ; and to effect it requires, in reality, nothing but for the legislature to say, it shall be done. As to the standard...
Page 18 - ... outweigh every other consideration. The system adopted by the French, if not absolutely the best, is so very near it, that the difference is of no account. In one point it is very unexceptionable ; it involves nothing that savours of the peculiarities of any country ; insomuch, as the Commissioners observe, that if all the history which we have been...
Page 17 - Playfair, who then held the Chair of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh. He had been originally intended for the Church, and had been a placed minister.
Page 5 - They resolved upon taking the ten-millionth part of the quadrant of a meridian, measured by calculation from the north pole to the equator.

Bibliographic information