Handbook of Bioentrepreneurship

Front Cover
Holger Patzelt, Thomas Brenner
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 11, 2008 - Business & Economics - 296 pages
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Providing an important and timely overview of research on the exciting area of entrepreneurship in biotechnology, The Handbook of Bioentrepreneurship examines one of the most promising industries of the 21st century. While genetically engineered food and biopharmaceuticals have made biotechnology part of our everyday life, starting a bioventure is among the most complex and risky entrepreneurial tasks given long development cycles, high technological and market uncertainty, and high capital intensity. Providing unparalleled in-depth and detailed analysis, this Handbook sheds light on business models and strategies, financing, cooperation networks between firms and universities, among other issues. With new developments in biotechnology increasingly in the news, this is an important source for readers interested in public policy, entrepreneurship, and business in the 21st century.

 

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Contents

73 Layers of MA Activities
138
732 MA Activities Between Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Companies
141
74 Summary and Future Research
144
References
145
Synergy Strategy and Serendipity Kirin Brewerys Entry into Biopharmaceuticals
149
82 The Locus of Entrepreneurship
150
83 Background
151
84 Synergy
152

261 Economic Geography of Clusters Spawned by Pharmaceuticals Firms
24
262 The Research and DBFLed Clusters in Israel and Canada
28
27 Conclusions
31
References
32
Geographic Clustering in Biotechnology Social Networks and Firm Foundings
35
32 Social Networks and Geographic Proximity
38
33 Social Networks and Entrepreneurship
40
332 Intellectual Capital
42
333 Human Capital
43
334 Financial Capital
44
34 Implications and Evidence
45
35 Policy Implications
47
36 Summary and Outlook
48
References
49
Innovation Networks in Biotechnology
53
42 The Nature of Innovation Networks
55
422 Biotechnology
56
423 The Changing Role of Universities
57
424 Theories of Industrial Organization
59
425 Innovation Networks
60
43 Recent Developments in Network Dynamics
68
44 Summary and Conclusions
76
References
78
Strategy and Strategic Thinking in Biotechnology Entrepreneurship
83
52 Sector Development Review
85
53 Innovation in Biotechnology
88
54 Theoretical Bases for Entrepreneurial Biotechnology
90
55 Strategic Management Entrepreneurship and Biotechnology
91
56 Strategy Components in EarlyStage Biotechnology Firms
93
562 Fit
94
563 Reactiveness
96
57 Discussion and Conclusions
97
References
99
Research on Strategic Alliances in Biotechnology An Assessment and Review
105
62 Why and with Whom Do Biotechnology Firms Form Alliances?
107
621 Access to Knowledge and Other Complementary Resources
108
622 Pursuit of Legitimacy
109
623 Choosing Partners
110
63 Governance of Alliances
111
64 Consequences of Alliances
115
641 Consequences of Accessing Knowledge and Other Complementary Resources
116
642 Consequences of Enhancing Legitimacy
120
Alliances as Relational Liability
121
65 Future Research
124
References
126
Mergers and Acquisitions in the Biotechnology Industry
133
72 Development of the Biotechnology Industry and the Need for MA
134
722 The Development of the Biotechnology Industry from an Organizational Perspective
135
723 The Development of the Biotechnology Industry from a Financial Perspective
137
841 Opportunity Recognition
155
843 Importance of Tacit Knowledge
156
844 Scientific Gatekeepers and Academic Collaboration
157
85 Serendipity
159
851 Origins of the Alliance with Amgen
160
852 Structure of the Joint Venture
162
853 Kirins Contributions and Manufacturing ScaleUp
163
854 Outcome of the Joint Venture
164
855 Key Success Factors
165
86 Strategy
167
862 Cell Therapy and Stem Cell Research
168
863 Monoclonal Antibodies and the Transgenic Mouse
169
87 Conclusions
172
References
174
A Survey Review of University Biotechnology and Entrepreneurship Commercialization
179
92 Commercialization of Science and Entrepreneurial Choice
180
93 Scientist Biotech Entrepreneurship
183
94 Conclusions
188
References
189
UniversityBased Biotechnology SpinOffs
193
1012 Entrepreneurial Universities
194
102 Scientific Entrepreneurship
196
University SpinOffs and UniversityBased SpinOffs
198
1031 UniversityBased SpinOffs as a New Organizational Form
199
1032 Levels of Analysis of USOs and USBOs
200
1033 A Life Cycle Approach to USOs
205
References
207
Patenting Biotechnology
211
Meaning and Scope
214
Continuity or Discontinuity?
215
An Overview
216
1132 Evolution of Patents in Biotechnology
220
Implications
222
1142 Implications of Patent Length
224
1143 Implications of Patent Scope Patent Scope and Anticommon Science
225
BioDiversity visavis Indigenous Science
238
115 Conclusion
240
References
241
Legal Frameworks and Public Support in the Biotechnology Industry
249
Rationales and Economic Relevance
250
Empirical Findings
252
1223 Evidence Concerning the Impact of Legal Framework Changes
257
123 Legal Framework Changes in Germany
258
124 An Empirical Assessment of the Contribution of Legal Framework Change
266
125 Future Research and Concluding Remarks
271
References
272
Index
275
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About the author (2008)

Holger Patzelt is a senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Economics in Jena, Germany. His research focuses on high technology entrepreneurship with a particular emphasis on strategic alliances and human capital. He has published in leading journals of natural sciences and social sciences. He holds a PhD in life sciences from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and a PhD in management from the University of Bamberg, Germany.

Thomas Brenner is associate director of the Max Planck Institute of Economics in Jena, Germany, and lecturer at the University of Jena. His research focuses on the spatial distribution of industry activities and local clustering. He has published a book on "Local Industrial Clusters: Existence, Emergence and Evolution" and many papers in leading economic and geographic journals. He holds a PhD in physics from the University of Stuttgart, Germany, and a PhD in economics from the University of Jena, Germany.