Handbook of Complex Variables

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Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 14, 1999 - Mathematics - 290 pages
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This book is written to be a convenient reference for the working scientist, student, or engineer who needs to know and use basic concepts in complex analysis. It is not a book of mathematical theory. It is instead a book of mathematical practice. All the basic ideas of complex analysis, as well as many typical applica tions, are treated. Since we are not developing theory and proofs, we have not been obliged to conform to a strict logical ordering of topics. Instead, topics have been organized for ease of reference, so that cognate topics appear in one place. Required background for reading the text is minimal: a good ground ing in (real variable) calculus will suffice. However, the reader who gets maximum utility from the book will be that reader who has had a course in complex analysis at some time in his life. This book is a handy com pendium of all basic facts about complex variable theory. But it is not a textbook, and a person would be hard put to endeavor to learn the subject by reading this book.
 

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Contents

III
1
IV
2
VI
3
VII
6
VIII
7
X
8
XIII
10
XIV
11
CXL
103
CXLI
104
CXLIII
105
CXLVI
106
CXLIX
107
CL
108
CLIII
109
CLIV
110

XV
12
XVIII
13
XX
14
XXI
15
XXII
16
XXIV
17
XXV
19
XXVI
21
XXVIII
22
XXXI
23
XXXII
24
XXXV
25
XXXVI
26
XXXVII
28
XXXIX
31
XL
32
XLI
33
XLII
34
XLIII
35
XLIV
36
XLV
37
XLVI
38
XLVII
41
XLVIII
42
L
43
LII
44
LIV
45
LVII
46
LIX
48
LXI
49
LXIII
50
LXV
51
LXVII
52
LXVIII
54
LXIX
56
LXX
58
LXXI
60
LXXII
62
LXXIII
63
LXXV
64
LXXVII
66
LXXIX
67
LXXXII
69
LXXXIII
70
LXXXV
71
LXXXVI
72
LXXXVIII
73
LXXXIX
74
XC
75
XCI
76
XCIII
77
XCVI
78
XCVIII
79
XCIX
80
C
81
CIII
83
CV
84
CVI
85
CX
86
CXI
87
CXIII
88
CXIV
89
CXV
90
CXVII
91
CXVIII
92
CXXI
93
CXXIV
94
CXXVI
95
CXXVIII
96
CXXX
97
CXXXI
98
CXXXIII
99
CXXXV
100
CXXXIX
101
CLVIII
111
CLX
112
CLXIII
113
CLXV
114
CLXIX
117
CLXX
118
CLXXIII
119
CLXXVI
120
CLXXVII
121
CLXXXI
122
CLXXXII
123
CLXXXIII
128
CLXXXVI
129
CLXXXVII
130
CLXXXIX
131
CXCI
132
CXCIII
133
CXCIV
134
CXCVII
135
CXCVIII
137
CC
138
CCI
139
CCII
140
CCIII
143
CCIV
144
CCVI
146
CCVII
147
CCVIII
149
CCIX
150
CCXII
151
CCXIII
152
CCXIV
153
CCXVIII
154
CCXIX
155
CCXXI
156
CCXXVII
157
CCXXXI
158
CCXXXV
159
CCXXXVII
160
CCXL
161
CCXLIV
162
CCXLVII
163
CCXLVIII
164
CCXLIX
168
CCL
169
CCLI
170
CCLII
172
CCLIII
175
CCLV
179
CCLVI
181
CCLVII
195
CCLIX
196
CCLX
197
CCLXI
198
CCLXII
199
CCLXIII
201
CCLXIV
202
CCLXVI
203
CCLXVII
210
CCLXVIII
212
CCLXIX
213
CCLXX
214
CCLXXII
215
CCLXXIII
219
CCLXXV
221
CCLXXVI
227
CCLXXVII
229
CCLXXIX
231
CCLXXX
269
CCLXXXI
273
CCLXXXII
275
CCLXXXIII
279
CCLXXXIV
283
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About the author (1999)

Steven Krantz, Ph.D., is Chairman of the Mathematics Department at Washington University in St. Louis. An award-winning teacher and author, Dr. Krantz has written more than 45 books on mathematics, including "Calculus Demystified," another popular title in this series. He lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

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