Handbook of Data Structures and Applications

Front Cover
Dinesh P. Mehta, Sartaj Sahni
CRC Press, Oct 28, 2004 - Computers - 1392 pages
Although there are many advanced and specialized texts and handbooks on algorithms, until now there was no book that focused exclusively on the wide variety of data structures that have been reported in the literature. The Handbook of Data Structures and Applications responds to the needs of students, professionals, and researchers who need a mainstream reference on data structures by providing a comprehensive survey of data structures of various types.

Divided into seven parts, the text begins with a review of introductory material, followed by a discussion of well-known classes of data structures, Priority Queues, Dictionary Structures, and Multidimensional structures. The editors next analyze miscellaneous data structures, which are well-known structures that elude easy classification. The book then addresses mechanisms and tools that were developed to facilitate the use of data structures in real programs. It concludes with an examination of the applications of data structures.

The Handbook is invaluable in suggesting new ideas for research in data structures, and for revealing application contexts in which they can be deployed. Practitioners devising algorithms will gain insight into organizing data, allowing them to solve algorithmic problems more efficiently.

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Contents

Data Structures for Sets
33-1
CacheOblivious Data Structures
34-1
Dynamic Trees
35-1
Dynamic Graphs
36-1
Succinct Representation of Data Structures
37-1
Randomized Graph DataStructures for Approximate Shortest Paths
38-1
Searching and Priority Queues in olog n Time
39-1
Data Structures in Languages and Libraries
39-15

DoubleEnded Priority Queues
8-1
Dictionary Structures
8-25
Hash Tables
9-1
Balanced Binary Search Trees
10-1
Finger Search Trees
11-1
Splay Trees
12-1
Randomized Dictionary Structures
13-1
Trees with Minimum Weighted Path Length
14-1
B Trees
15-1
Multidimensional and Spatial Structures
15-23
Multidimensional Spatial Data Structures
16-1
Planar Straight Line Graphs
17-1
Interval Segment Range and Priority Search Trees
18-1
Quadtrees and Octrees
19-1
Binary Space Partitioning Trees
20-1
Rtrees
21-1
Managing SpatioTemporal Data
22-1
Kinetic Data Structures
23-1
Online Dictionary Structures
24-1
Cuttings
25-1
Approximate Geometric Query Structures
26-1
Geometric and Spatial Data Structures in External Memory
27-1
Miscellaneous Data Structures
27-35
Tries
28-1
Suffix Trees and Suffix Arrays
29-1
String Searching
30-1
Persistent Data Structures
31-1
PQ Trees PC Trees and Planar Graphs
32-1
Functional Data Structures
40-1
LEDA a Platform for Combinatorial and Geometric Computing
41-1
Data Structures in C++
42-1
Data Structures in JDSL
43-1
Data Structure Visualization
44-1
Drawing Trees
45-1
Drawing Graphs
46-1
Concurrent Data Structures
47-1
Applications
47-31
IP Router Tables
48-1
MultiDimensional Packet Classification
49-1
Data Structures in Web Information Retrieval
50-1
The Web as a Dynamic Graph
51-1
Layout Data Structures
52-1
Floorplan Representation in VLSI
53-1
Computer Graphics
54-1
Geographic Information Systems
55-1
Collision Detection
56-1
Image Data Structures
57-1
Computational Biology
58-1
Elimination Structures in Scientific Computing
59-1
Data Structures for Databases
60-1
Data Mining
61-1
Computational Geometry Fundamental Structures
62-1
Computational Geometry Proximity and Location
63-1
Computational Geometry Generalized Intersection Searching
64-1
Index
I-1
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Sartaj K. Sahni is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Minnesota. He has published over 90 research articles in design and analysis of efficient algorithms, parallel computing, interconnection networks, and design automation. He is co-author of Fundamentals of Data Structures and Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms and author of Concepts in Discreet Mathematics and Software Development of Pascal. He took his B. Tech in electrical engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and his MS and PhD in computer science at Cornell University.

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