Handbook of International Law

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Oct 27, 2005 - Law
2 Reviews
A concise account of international law by an experienced practitioner, this book explains how states and international organisations, especially the United Nations, make and use international law. The nature of international law and its fundamental concepts and principles are described. The difference and relationship between various areas of international law which are often misunderstood (such as diplomatic and state immunity, and human rights and international humanitarian law) are clearly explained. The essence of new specialist areas of international law, relating to the environment, human rights and terrorism are discussed. Aust's clear and accessible style makes the subject understandable to non-international lawyers, non-lawyers and students. Abundant references are provided to sources and other materials, including authoritative and useful websites.
 

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This book is thoroughly inadequate and cursory in helping people learn about international law. It offers no in-depth description of any important cases by the International Court of Justice or any other international tribunal. Further, its brief summaries of various issues such as jus cogens and other major issues in international are so overly simplified that they are misleading in what their actual meanings are. Granted, the chapter on diplomatic immunity does have a good section on the diplomatic bag; however, the rest of that chapter is rather sparse. For those who want to learn about international law, I highly recommend avoiding this text. 

Contents

VIII
1
X
2
XI
5
XII
12
XIII
13
XIV
16
XVI
17
XVII
21
CXXXVII
252
CXXXVIII
254
CXXXIX
255
CXL
257
CXLI
258
CXLII
259
CXLIV
260
CXLV
261

XVIII
23
XIX
24
XX
26
XXI
28
XXII
29
XXIII
33
XXIV
34
XXVI
35
XXIX
40
XXX
41
XXXII
43
XXXIII
44
XXXV
45
XXXVIII
46
XXXIX
48
XL
49
XLI
51
XLII
52
XLIV
55
XLV
57
XLVI
59
XLVII
60
XLVIII
61
XLIX
62
L
66
LI
67
LII
77
LIII
79
LIV
86
LV
88
LVII
97
LVIII
98
LIX
100
LX
107
LXI
109
LXII
111
LXIII
114
LXIV
116
LXV
117
LXVI
118
LXVII
119
LXVIII
120
LXIX
123
LXX
130
LXXI
131
LXXIII
132
LXXV
135
LXXVI
136
LXXVII
137
LXXVIII
138
LXXX
139
LXXXI
143
LXXXII
144
LXXXIV
146
LXXXVI
147
LXXXVII
148
LXXXIX
149
XCI
150
XCIII
151
XCIV
152
XCV
153
XCVI
154
XCVII
155
XCVIII
156
XCIX
159
C
160
CI
162
CII
163
CIII
164
CIV
174
CV
175
CVI
177
CVII
179
CIX
184
CX
187
CXI
188
CXII
196
CXIII
197
CXIV
198
CXV
199
CXVI
203
CXVIII
205
CXIX
207
CXXI
208
CXXIII
211
CXXIV
222
CXXV
223
CXXVI
233
CXXVII
234
CXXVIII
235
CXXX
237
CXXXI
239
CXXXII
244
CXXXIII
245
CXXXV
246
CXXXVI
251
CXLVI
262
CXLVII
263
CXLVIII
264
CXLIX
268
CL
273
CLI
277
CLII
283
CLIII
284
CLV
294
CLVI
298
CLVII
299
CLVIII
300
CLIX
301
CLX
304
CLXII
306
CLXIII
309
CLXV
311
CLXVI
312
CLXVII
316
CLXVIII
317
CLXIX
319
CLXXI
322
CLXXIII
323
CLXXV
327
CLXXVI
329
CLXXVIII
330
CLXXIX
333
CLXXX
334
CLXXXI
336
CLXXXII
337
CLXXXIII
338
CLXXXIV
340
CLXXXV
341
CLXXXVI
344
CLXXXVII
345
CLXXXVIII
346
CXC
347
CXCIII
348
CXCIV
349
CXCV
350
CXCVI
351
CXCVII
352
CXCVIII
354
CC
361
CCI
362
CCIII
364
CCIV
367
CCV
372
CCVI
373
CCVII
379
CCVIII
382
CCX
387
CCXI
388
CCXII
389
CCXIII
390
CCXIV
391
CCXVII
392
CCXIX
393
CCXXIII
401
CCXXIV
403
CCXXV
405
CCXXVI
407
CCXXVII
408
CCXXVIII
409
CCXXIX
410
CCXXXI
414
CCXXXII
416
CCXXXIII
417
CCXXXIV
418
CCXXXVI
423
CCXXXVII
425
CCXXXVIII
428
CCXXXIX
429
CCXL
431
CCXLI
435
CCXLII
436
CCXLIII
442
CCXLIV
448
CCXLV
466
CCXLVI
467
CCXLVII
470
CCXLIX
471
CCL
472
CCLI
473
CCLIII
474
CCLIV
475
CCLV
476
CCLVI
478
CCLVII
479
CCLVIII
480
CCLIX
481
CCLXII
482
CCLXV
483
CCLXVIII
485
CCLXIX
486
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Page 6 - ... international custom, as evidence of a general practice accepted as law ; c. the general principles of law recognized by civilized nations ; d. subject to the provisions of Article 59, judicial decisions and the teachings of the most highly qualified publicists of the various nations, as subsidiary means for the determination of rules of law.

About the author (2005)

Visiting Professor, London School of Economics and University College London

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