Handbook of Mechanical In-Service Inspection: Pressure Systems and Mechanical Plant

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John Wiley & Sons, Jan 7, 2004 - Technology & Engineering - 690 pages
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This comprehensive sister volume to Cliff Matthews’ highly successful Handbook of Mechanical Works Inspection gives a detailed coverage of pressure equipment and other mechanical plant such as cranes and rotating equipment.

Key features:

  • Accessible source of information
  • Lavishly illustrated with numerous diagrams, photographs, and tables
  • A wealth of valuable information
  • Detailed, comprehensive coverage
  • Written in easily accessible style
  • A ‘must buy’ reference book

The Handbook of Mechanical In-Service Inspection is a vital source of information for:

  • plant owners and operators maintenance engineers  
  • inspection engineers from insurance companies and ‘competent bodies’ who perform in-service inspection  
  • health and safety operatives  
  • engineers operating pressure systems and mechanical plant  
  • all those concerned with the safe and efficient operation of machinery, plant, and pressure equipment.

All engineering pressure systems and other types of mechanical equipment must be installed, operated, and maintained properly. It must be safe and comply with standards, regulations, and guidelines.  In-service inspection is more formally controlled by statutory requirements than other types of inspection. The Handbook of Mechanical In-service Inspection puts a good deal of emphasis on the ‘compliance’ aspects and the ‘duty of care’ requirements placed on plant owners, operators, and inspectors.

The book is suitable for those who operate pressure systems, lifting equipment, and similar mechanical plant are subject to rigorous inspection from external bodies as a matter of course. All operators have a duty to conduct in-service checks and internal inspection procedures to ensure the safe, reliable, and economic running of their equipment.

 

 

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Contents

Inservice inspection versus construction inspection
5
The Inspection Business Who Does What?
11
Classification societies
17
Inspection organizations
24
Conclusion the inservice inspection business
30
The technical skills of the inspector
40
The Management of InService Inspection
49
The Pressure Systems Safety Regulations
57
PRV technical standards
311
PRVs glossary of terms
322
Pipework inservice inspection
328
Highintegrity pipework
334
Glass reinforced plastic GRP relining
349
Smallbore tubing systems
356
Storage Tanks
363
Tank inspections
372

Bibliography
91
Visual inspection
100
Surface crack detection
106
Volumetric NOT
115
NOT standards
147
RBI the basic techniques
157
RBI standards and published documents
178
Failure
185
Fatigue
191
Useful references
206
FitnessForPurposeService Assessment
213
Analysing fracture the failure assessment diagram FAD
219
Analysing fatigue
225
1999
232
Sample BS 7910 calculation procedure
240
Pressure Testing
249
Vacuum leak testing
256
Inservice test procedures for pressureequipment types
267
API 510
277
Inservice inspection of pressure vessels engineering aspects
283
Protective Devices
293
Inservice inspection of PRVs
299
Heat Recovery Steam Generators HRSGs
397
HRSG materials of construction
403
Hightemperature HRSG headers
408
HRSG steam drums
427
Attemporators
442
Heat Exchangers
457
NOT techniques
478
Inservice inspection of transportable pressure equipment
493
Crane types and construction
508
cranes
529
Common terminology
547
Small Industrial Lifting Tackle
573
The role of the inservice inspectors
575
Reference standards
585
The CSWIP Plant Inspector Certification Scheme
613
Websites quick reference
621
Summary of inservice inspection requirements worldwide
627
SAFeD publications and fact sheets
633
Degradation mechanisms refiningpetrochemical applications
653
European and American associations and organizations
669
Index
683
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information