Handbook of Nanoscopy, 2 Volume Set

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Gustaaf van Tendeloo, Dirk van Dyck, Stephen J. Pennycook
John Wiley & Sons, Dec 21, 2012 - Technology & Engineering - 1450 pages
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This completely revised successor to the Handbook of Microscopy supplies in-depth coverage of all imaging technologies from the optical
to the electron and scanning techniques. Adopting a twofold approach, the book firstly presents the various technologies as such, before going
on to cover the materials class by class, analyzing how the different imaging methods can be successfully applied. It covers the latest developments in techniques, such as in-situ TEM, 3D imaging in TEM and SEM, as well as a broad range of material types, including metals,
alloys, ceramics, polymers, semiconductors, minerals, quasicrystals, amorphous solids, among others. The volumes are divided between
methods and applications, making this both a reliable reference and handbook for chemists, physicists, biologists, materials scientists and
engineers, as well as graduate students and their lecturers.
 

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Contents

LowEnergy Electron Microscopy
673
SpinPolarized LowEnergy Electron Microscopy
697
Soft XRay Imaging and Spectromicroscopy
745
Principle and Applications
793
Signal and Noise Maximum Likelihood Estimation in MRI
833
Microscopy Images
855
Applications
877
Nanoparticles
879

UltrahighResolution Transmission Electron Microscopy at Negative
81
Image Simulation and Quantification
140
References
146
Electron Holography
153
Lorentz Microscopy and Electron Holography of Magnetic
221
Electron Tomography
253
183
275
Statistical Parameter Estimation Theory A Tool for Quantitative
281
Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy
309
Transmission Electron Microscopy as Nanolab
345
AtomicResolution Environmental Transmission Electron
375
Speckles in Images and Diffraction Patterns
405
Coherent Electron Diffractive Imaging
437
Sample Preparation Techniques for Transmission Electron
473
Scanning Probe Microscopy History Background
499
Scanning Probe MicroscopyForces and Currents in the Nanoscale
539
Scanning Beam Methods
615
Fundamentals ofthe Focused Ion Beam System
645
Contents to Volume 2
v
Preface XIX
xix
Fundamentals ofthe Focused Ion Beam System 645
672
The Past the Present and the Future of Nanoscopy 1
950
Nanowires and Nanotubes
961
Carbon Nanoforms
995
15
1005
References
1060
Metals and Alloys
1071
Transmission Electron Microscopy 11
1095
In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy on Metals
1099
Semiconductors and Semiconducting Devices
1153
Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy 45
1157
Complex Oxide Materials
1179
UltrahighResolution Transmission Electron Microscopy at Negative
1180
Application ofTransmission Electron Microscopy in the Research
1213
ZContrast Imaging 109
1217
Polymers
1247
Ferroic and Multiferroic Materials
1273
ThreeDimensional Imaging of Biomaterials with Electron
1303
Small Organic Molecules and Higher Homologs
1335
Electron Holography 153
1373
Index
1381
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About the author (2012)

Gustaaf Van Tendeloo studied physics and graduated from the University of Antwerp in 1974. He is now a professor at the University of Antwerp (UA) and part time professor at the University of Brussels (VUB). His research focuses on the applications of electron microscopy to different aspects of materials science. He is the author of 700 publications with over 16 000 citations to his work. Professor Van Tendeloo is the head of the electron microscopy group EMAT and director of the "Nano Center of Excellence" of the University. In 2009, he received an ERC
Advanced Grant.

Dirk Van Dyck is professor in physics and honorary vice-rector for research at the University of Antwerp. He graduated from the University of Antwerp in 1976 and spent his career at this University. Professor Van Dyck and has authored over 300 scientific publications in international
journals and was invited speaker at numerous conferences on electron microscopy and image processing. He was one of the co-editors of the Handbook of Microscopy. He received the Honory Franqui Chair of the University of Leuven and holds a Honorary Doctorship of the University of Lima.

Stephen J. Pennycook is a Corporate Fellow in the Materials Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and leader of the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Group. He graduated from the University of Cambridge in 1975, moving to Oak Ridge
National Laboratory in 1982. Professor Pennycook has authored over 380 scientific publications in international journals and was invited speaker at over 200 conferences. He is a member of the editorial boards of four journals and a fellow of five professional societies. For his work on Z-contrast microscopy he was awarded the Materials Research Society Medal and the Thomas Young Medal of the Institute of Physics.

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