Handbook of Religion and the Authority of Science

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James R. Lewis, Olav Hammer
BRILL, Nov 19, 2010 - Religion - 924 pages
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There has been a significant but little-noticed aspect of the interface between science and religion, namely the widespread tendency of religions to appeal to science in support of their truth claims. Though the appeal to science is most evident in more recent religions like Christian Science and Scientology, no major faith tradition is exempt from this pattern. Members of almost every religion desire to see their truths supported by the authority of science especially in the midst of the present historical period, when all of the comforting old certainties seem problematic and threatened. The present collection examines this pattern in a wide variety of different religions and spiritual movements, and demonstrates the many different ways in which religions appeal to the authority of science. The result is a wide-ranging and uniquely compelling study of how religions adapt their message to one of the major challenges presented by the contemporary world.
 

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Contents

Introduction Olav Hammer and James R Lewis
1
THEORETICAL
21
BUDDHISM AND EAST ASIAN TRADITIONS
115
SOUTH ASIAN TRADITIONS
205
JUDAISM AND ISLAM
439
CHRISTIAN TRADITION
511
SPIRITUALISM AND SPIRITISM
589
NEW AGE AND OCCULT
671
ALTERNATIVE ARCHAEOLOGIES
763
THEORIES AND SCEPTICS
845
General Index
901
Index of Names
919
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

James R. Lewis, Ph.D. (University of Wales Lampeter, 2003) in Religious Studies, is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Tromsĝ. He has published extensively on New Religions and edits the Brill Handbooks on Contemporary Religion series.


Olav Hammer, Ph.D. (Lund, Sweden, 2000) in History of Religions, is Professor of the Study of Religions at the University of Southern Denmark. He has mainly published on contemporary esoteric currents and new religious movements.

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