Handbook of Self-Enhancement and Self-Protection

Front Cover
Mark D. Alicke, Constantine Sedikides
Guilford Press, Feb 22, 2011 - Psychology - 524 pages

This is the first major volume dedicated to the processes by which people exaggerate their virtues, deemphasize their shortcomings, or protect themselves against threatening feedback. Leading investigators present cutting-edge work on the key role of self-enhancing and self-protective motives in social perception, cognition, judgment, and behavior. Compelling topics include the psychological benefits and risks of self-enhancement and self-protection; personality traits and contextual factors that make certain individuals more likely to hold distorted views of the self; innovative approaches to assessment and measurement; and implications for relationships, achievement, and mental health.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1
23
Chapter 2
49
Chapter 3
69
Chapter 4
92
Chapter 5
112
Chapter 6
128
Chapter 7
155
Chapter 13
279
Chapter 14
298
Chapter 15
320
Chapter 16
341
Chapter 17
358
Chapter 18
380
Chapter 19
399
Chapter 20
425

Chapter 8
174
Chapter 9
192
Chapter 10
211
Chapter 11
235
Chapter 12
258

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About the author (2011)

Mark D. Alicke, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at Ohio University. His main research interests are the psychology of the self—including the role of the self in social judgment, social comparison, and self-enhancement biases—and the psychology of blame and moral judgment. Dr. Alicke has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, as an Associate Editor of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and is currently Editor of Self and Identity.  Constantine Sedikides, PhD, is Professor and Director of the Centre for Research on Self and Identity at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. His research focuses on self and identity and their interplay with emotion and motivation, close relationships, and group processes.

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