Handbook of Social Economics

Front Cover
Elsevier, Nov 26, 2010 - Social Science - 940 pages

How can economists define social preferences and interactions?

Culture, familial beliefs, religion, and other sources contain the origins of social preferences. Those preferences--the desire for social status, for instance, or the disinclination to receive financial support--often accompany predictable economic outcomes. Through the use of new economic data and tools, our contributors survey an array of social interactions and decisions that typify homo economicus. Their work brings order to the sometimes conflicting claims that countries, environments, beliefs, and other influences make on our economic decisions.

  • Describes recent scholarship on social choice and introduces new evidence about social preferences
  • Advances our understanding about quantifying social interactions and the effects of culture
  • Summarizes research on theoretical and applied economic analyses of social preferences
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Social Actions
510
IndexVolume 1A
101

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Alberto Bisin is Professor of Economics at New York University and an elected fellow of the Econometric Society. He is also fellow of the NBER, the CEPR, and CESS at NYU, CIREQ. He has been Associate Editor of the Journal of Economic Theory, of Economic Theory, and of Research in Economics. He is founding editor of noiseFromAmerika.org and contributes op-eds for the italian newspaper La Repubblica. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, obtained in 1994. His main contributions are in the fields of Social Economics, Financial Economics, and Behavioral Economics.

Bibliographic information