Handbook of Style in Use at the Riverside Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts

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Houghton Mifflin, 1913 - Authorship - 35 pages
 

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Page 5 - Ala., Alabama. Ariz., Arizona. Ark., Arkansas. Cal., California. Colo., Colorado. Conn., Connecticut. Del., Delaware. DC, District of Columbia. Fla., Florida. Ga., Georgia.
Page 24 - It will be seen that the system which effectually secured our liberties against the encroachments of kingly power gave birth to a new class of abuses from which absolute monarchies are exempt. It will be seen that, in consequence partly of unwise interference, and partly of unwise neglect, the increase of wealth and the extension of trade produced , together with immense good, some evils from which poor and rude societies are free.
Page 22 - I shall relate how the new settlement was, during many troubled years, successfully defended against foreign and domestic enemies ; how, under that settlement, the authority of law and the security of property were found to be compatible with a liberty of discussion and of individual action never before known...
Page 5 - Oreg., Oregon. Pa., Pennsylvania. RI, Rhode Island. SC, South Carolina. S. Dak., South Dakota. Tenn., Tennessee. Tex., Texas. Vt., Vermont. Va., Virginia. Wash., Washington. W. Va., West Virginia. Wis., Wisconsin. Wyo., Wyoming.
Page 23 - They abandoned their native speech, and adopted the French tongue, in which the Latin was the predominant element. They speedily raised their new language to a dignity and importance which it had never before possessed. They found it a barbarous jargon ; they fixed it in writing ; and they employed it in legislation, in poetry, and in romance. They renounced that brutal intemperance to which all the other branches of the great German family were too much inclined. The polite luxury of the Norman...
Page 9 - ... Atlantic Ocean, Dead Sea, Baffin's Bay, Gulf of Mexico, Straits of Gibraltar, Straits Settlements, Mississippi River, Three Rivers, Laughing Brook, Rocky Mountains, Blue Hills, Pike's Peak, Mount of Olives, Great Desert, Death Valley, Prince Edward Island, Sea (Lake) of Galilee. But do not capitalize words of this class when simply added by way of description to the specific name, without forming an organic part of such name: the river Elbe, the desert of Sahara, the island of Madagascar. Subject...
Page 31 - ... immortalize italicize jeopardize legalize liberalize localize magnetize memorialize mesmerize metamorphize methodize minimize modernize monopolize moralize nationalize naturalize neutralize organize ostracize oxidize paralyze particularize pasteurize patronize philosophize plagiarize polarize professionalize protestantize pulverize realize recognize reorganize revolutionize satirize scandalize scrutinize signalize solemnize . soliloquize specialize spiritualize standardize...
Page 31 - ... surprise aggrandize agonize analyze anatomize anglicize apologize apostrophize apprize (to appraise) authorize autolyze baptize brutalize canonize catechize catholicize cauterize centralize characterize Christianize civilize classicize colonize criticize crystallize demoralize deputize dogmatize dramatize economize emphasize energize epitomize equalize eulogize evangelize extemporize familiarize fertilize fossilize fraternize galvanize generalize gormandize harmonize hellenize humanize immortalize...
Page 13 - In fine, nothing is said now that has not been said before. Wherefore it is but just that you should know this, and make allowance, if the moderns do what the ancients used to do.
Page 25 - Quotations," which may be found elsewhere in this volume. Here he gives a belated, though stilted (and somewhat obscure), exposition of the subject. APOSTROPHE 175. An apostrophe is used to mark the omission of a letter or letters in the contraction of a word or of figures in a number. In the case of contractions containing a verb and a negative, the negative is attached to the parentword and no space is required between them: don't ne'er the class of '96 haven't 'twas early in '22 m'f'g 'twasn't...

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