Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training

Front Cover
Heimo H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, Jan Martin Pawlowski
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 22, 2008 - Education - 465 pages
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Education and training have faced many challenges in the past five years – political, educational, and technological trends such as the European Bologna process, Lifelong Learning and the use of Social Software are just a few of the factors influencing this field. Furthermore, technology-enhanced lea- ing has become the mainstream of educational and training innovation. Within this context, this second edition of the Handbook on “Infor- tion Technologies for Learning, Education, and Training” attempts to capture the state-of-the-art in technology-enhanced learning, as it has emerged during the last years and anticipates important future developments. As the Handbook Editors, we have aimed to provide a comprehensive guide for both researchers and practitioners working in the field of Technology-enhanced Learning and Training. Our overall objective is to enable the reader to gain a deep understanding of the past, present, and future research and applications in this field. From a research perspective, the readers will obtain an in-depth und- standing of the complex theories, strategies, concepts, and methods of Technology-enhanced Learning. Based on these fundamentals they will be able to develop new and innovative approaches for the next generation of Technology-enhanced Learning.
 

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Contents

A Typology of Learning Object Repositories
5
111 Reuse and Repurposing
6
112 Federated Searches and Harvesting
7
12 Types of LORs
8
13 LOR Features
21
14 Discussion
22
15 Conclusion
25
154 With the Vast Amounts of Information Available on the Internet Is There a Need for LORs?
26
References
234
The EPedagogy
236
Bridging the Gap Between FacetoFace and Cyber Interaction in Holistic Blended Learning Environments
237
131 Introduction
240
132 Literature Review
242
1322 Classroom Climate
243
1323 Learning Effectiveness
244
133 Research Methodology
245

Adaptive Hypermedia
29
22 Adaptation Methods in Educational Hypermedia
31
23 Overlay User Models
34
231 Registering Changes in Learners Knowledge
35
232 Deducing Knowledge About Higher Level Concepts
36
233 Which User Model State to Use in Adaptation?
39
24 Adaptation to Other Aspects Besides Knowledge
40
241 Adaptation to Learning Styles
41
242 Adaptation to the Browsing Environment
42
25 SummaryConclusions
43
References
44
Ontologies and Semantic Web for ELearning
47
32 Overview of WBES
48
322 Semantic WBES
50
33 Ontologies in Education
54
331 The O4E Ontology
55
332 The Ontologies for Education Portal
58
34 Topic Maps for ELearning TM4L
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341 TM4L Editor
60
342 TM4L Viewer
61
References
62
Design and Case Studies on Mobile and Wireless Technologies in Education
66
42 Mobile Technologies
68
422 Wireless Networks
69
423 Issues and Limitations
71
43 Case Studies and Examples
73
433 Mobile Language Learning Applications
74
44 Conclusion and Further Research
76
Ambient Intelligence and Ubiquitous Computing
79
52 Technology
82
521 Technology Trends
83
53 Architectures
84
54 Standards
86
55 Application Areas
88
552 Healthcare
89
553 University Education
90
561 Definitions
91
562 Characteristics
92
563 Learning Concepts
93
564 Recent Developments
94
57 Conclusion and Further Research
95
References
96
Designing Contextualized Learning
101
62 Contextualized Learning
102
RAFT Project
103
631 Prototyping and Scenario Based Analysis
104
632 Functional Analysis and Role Model Design
105
633 Information Architecture and Use Case Analysis
107
64 Conclusions
109
References
110
Virtual and Augmented Reality
112
72 Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Versus Pedagogical Models
114
73 Review of the Main Enabling Technologies
119
731 Virtual Engine
120
732 InputOutput Devices
123
733 Interaction and Reactive Feedback Devices
124
75 Perspectives
128
References
129
Enabling Interoperability and ReUse
133
Learning Design Concepts
135
82 High Quality Learning Designs
136
83 Applying the Learning Designs in Online Courses
138
84 The IMS Learning Design Specification
140
843 The Conceptual Model
141
844 The Information Model and XML Binding
145
85 Interpreting IMS LD
147
86 Conclusion
148
Acknowledgement
150
Competence Models in TechnologyEnhanced CompetenceBased Learning
155
92 The Concept of Competence
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A Literature Review
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923 Competence Development
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924 Towards a Unified Definition of Competence
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925 Competence Models
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93 Competence Specifications and Discussion
169
94 Conclusions
173
Acknowledgements
174
Learner Modelling Through Analyzing Cognitive Skills and Learning Styles
178
102 Identifying Individual Differences
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1021 Identifying Cognitive Traits
182
1022 Identifying Learning Styles
184
1023 Relationship Between Cognitive Traits and Learning Styles
186
103 Providing Adaptivity
188
1032 Adaptivity Based on Learning Styles
190
104 Conclusion
191
References
192
Turning Potentials into Reality Achieving Sustainable Quality in ELearning Through Quality Competence
195
A Field of Great Diversity
197
113 Methodology and Instruments to Develop Quality for ELearning
199
1131 Quality Management Approaches
200
1133 Evaluation Approaches for ELearning
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1135 Further Quality Approaches for ELearning
202
Competencies for Sustainable Quality Development
203
1141 The Four Dimensions of Quality Literacy
205
A Negotiation Process
208
116 Summary and Conclusion
212
References
213
Integration of Learning and Working Convergent Processes and Systems
217
122 Integration
219
1221 Process Integration
220
123 Systems Integration Based on Learning Technology Standards
225
124 A StepbyStep Guide Towards Process and Systems Integration Based on Standards
227
1241 Application Scenario
228
1242 Awareness Building and Context Setting
229
1243 Process Analysis and Redesign
230
1244 Designing Shared Services and Systems
231
1245 Integrating Data and Information
232
125 Conclusion
233
134 Result and Discussion
248
1341 Classroom Climate
249
1342 Learning Satisfaction
250
1343 Test Scores
251
1344 The Correlation Between Classroom Climate and Learning Effectiveness
252
Acknowledgement
253
References
257
Complex Domain Learning
261
142 Complex Domains
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143 ELearning
267
144 ELearning in Complex Domains
268
145 Assessment and Evaluation
270
146 Future Developments
271
References
272
Communities of Practice
276
152 Learning as Participation
278
1521 Types of CoPs
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1522 Online Communities Virtual Communities
280
153 CoP as a Metaphor for Online Design
283
1531 Guideposts for Design
284
1532 Frameworks for Design
285
154 Current Research
288
1542 Limits to the Instructional Use of CoPs
289
References
290
Business Models for the Sustainable Implementation of ELearning at Universities
295
162 Business Models at Universities
297
163 Business Models from a University Perspective
300
Which Tasks and Processes Need to Be Accomplished for ProductService Provision Purposes?
304
How Can Economic Viability Be Assured?
308
164 Formation and Application of Frame of Reference
310
The Beginning of the End?
312
References
313
The Role of Competence Assessment in the Different Stages of Competence Development
316
172 What Are Competence Development and Competence Assessment?
319
1722 Competence Assessment
320
173 Processes in Competence Development and Competence Assessment
322
1731 Perspectives on Processes in Competence Development
323
1732 Perspectives on Processes in Competence Assessment
325
174 Integrating Competence Assessment and Competence Development
327
1742 Assessment Forms Within the Cycle of Competence Development
330
175 Assessment in the Four Stages of Competence Development
332
Evidence Collection by the Learner
333
Assessment by Others
334
Performing Competence Development Activities
337
176 Conclusions
339
The Organisational Perspective
342
The Future of ELearning in Schools
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181 Twentieth Century Learning
346
183 Web 20 and the Possibilities for ELearning 20
348
ELearning 20
349
1841 Teachers as well as Students Must Be Fluent with the Medium
350
1842 Pedagogy Must Be Adapted to the New Environment While Satisfying Existing Curricular Goals
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1843 Student and TeacherGenerated Content Will Become Significant Beyond the Classroom
354
1844 Teachers Will Have the Tools to Exercise Greater Control Over Their Instructional Design
357
1845 Teachers Will Be Able to Engage in an Accelerated Level of PeertoPeer Collaboration
358
185 Conclusion
359
References
360
An Executable Model for Virtual Campus Environments
363
192 Revisiting Virtual Campus Models
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1922 The Explor Implementation of the Virtual Campus Model
369
1923 Values and Limits of the Explor Implementation of the Virtual Campus Model
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193 Vision and Orientation for a New Virtual Campus Model
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1932 Orientation Principles
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1933 Systems Levels and Main Actors
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194 A Virtual Campus Framework and an Ontology for TELOS
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1942 A ServiceOriented Framework for the Virtual Campus Model
382
1943 The Virtual Campus Model as an Ontology
384
195 The TELOS Software Architecture
385
1951 TELOS Aggregates and Scenarios
387
1952 Technological Backend
390
1953 Semantic Referential Services
391
196 Cases
393
1962 Building an ELearning Platform
396
1963 Designing an ELearning Environment
398
Expected Benefits for ELearning Environments
400
References
401
Corporate Universities
404
The Role and Tasks of a Corporate University Today
407
How People Want to Learn
409
204 The Future Path of Corporate Universities
414
205 Conclusion
420
Lessons from Africa
423
212 Why ICT for Education in Africa?
424
2122 The Opportunities
425
213 The Literature
426
2133 OpenSourcing
427
2135 Supply Chaining
428
214 Lessons Learnt the Hard Way
429
215 Ten Case Studies
431
2153 Schools Develop Their Own Software and Websites
432
2157 Educator Training
433
21511 Future Plans
434
2161 Import
435
2162 Transfer
436
References
437
The African Virtual University
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222 A Short History
440
223 Adapting to a Changing Educational Environment
441
224 The AVU InCountry Strategy
446
225 The AVU Capacity Enhancement Program
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226 The AVU Learning Architecture
449
227 The Dual Challenges of Connectivity and Bandwidth
451
228 The AVU Open Educational Resources OER Strategy
453
229 Conclusion
456
References
459
Index
462
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