Harmony, Perspective, and Triadic Cognition

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 29, 2011 - Psychology
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The big question in the science of psychology is: why is human cognition and behavior so different from the capabilities of every other animal species on Earth – including our close genetic relations, the chimpanzees? This book provides a coherent answer by examining those aspects of the human brain that have made triadic forms of perception and cognition possible. Mechanisms of dyadic association sufficiently explain animal perception, cognition and behavior but a three-way associational mechanism is required to explain the human talents for language, tool-making, harmony perception, pictorial depth perception and the joint attention that underlies all forms of social cooperation.
 

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Contents

Harmony
26
Perspective
120
Tools and Handedness
175
Language
216
Consciousness
255
Other Human Talents
307
Conclusion
329
References
337
Index
351
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About the author (2011)

Norman D. Cook has authored three books on human psychology, Stability and Flexibility (1980), The Brain Code (1986) and Tone of Voice and Mind (2002). He has also published articles in numerous journals, including Nature, Perception, Journal of Experimental Psychology, Brain, American Scientist, Behavioral Science, Empirical Aesthetics, Music Perception, Spatial Vision, Cognitive Science, Brain and Language, Brain and Cognition, Consciousness and Cognition and Neuroscience. He is currently a professor of cognitive psychology at Kansai University (Osaka, Japan).

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