Hasidism in Israel: A History of the Hasidic Movement and Its Masters in the Holy Land

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Jason Aronson, 2000 - Religion - 316 pages
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The movement was Hasidism, the cataclysmic force that wiped away the narrow intellectualism that had estranged the Jewish masses from their heritage. Hasidism focused upon fundamental Judaism, on sublimely simple principles that stressed the joy of life, love of man, and sincerity in word and deed, qualities that the common people potentially possessed in full measure. The hasidic link with the Land of Israel is strong indeed. Apart from the United States of America, Israel now has the largest number of hasidim, probably numbering more than two hundred thousand. They are known by the dress they wear, by the way they speak, and by the melodies they hum. This is the first work of its kind to study the history and development of the hasidic community in Israel, from its foundation in the eighteenth century to the present.
 

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Hasidism in Israel: a history of the Hasidic movement and its masters in the Holy Land

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Rabbi Rabinowicz, who also served as editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of Hasidism, continues to enrich Jewish scholarship, further deepen understanding, and delight the mind in his new book, which ... Read full review

Contents

Ger A Kingdom of Torah
1
Belz The Sabra Rebbe
23
Vizhnitz A Center of Yiddishkeit
37
Kiryat Zanz A Rebbes Dream
53
Habad The Global Lamplighters
71
Jerusalem and a Unique Community
89
Servants of the Lord
105
Dynastic Revivals
121
The Singing Rabbi and His Neighbors
173
Dissent in the Movement
187
Trees with Many Branches
207
Cities of the Kabbalah
227
Hasidic Luminaries
241
The Munkacz Dynasty
253
Abdication of a Rabbi
271
Glossary
291

From Boston to Rahmastrivka
137
A Lithuanian and Romanian Legacy
147
Bene Berak A Miniature Torah Town
159

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About the author (2000)

Tzvi Rabinowicz, a descendant of famous hasidic families in Poland, was the regional rabbi of Cricklewood, Willesden and Brondesbury Synagogues in London. He obtained a bachelor's degree from the University of London, where he was also awarded a Ph.D. for his thesis entitled, "The Life and Times of Rabbi Joseph Colon (1420-1480)," a study of Italian Jewry during the Renaissance. He received a Rabbinical Diploma from Jews' College, London.

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