Havana and the Atlantic in the Sixteenth Century

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Feb 1, 2011 - History - 304 pages
Havana in the 1550s was a small coastal village with a very limited population that was vulnerable to attack. By 1610, however, under Spanish rule it had become one of the best-fortified port cities in the world and an Atlantic center of shipping, commerce, and shipbuilding. Using all available local Cuban sources, Alejandro de la Fuente provides the first examination of the transformation of Havana into a vibrant Atlantic port city and the fastest-growing urban center in the Americas in the late sixteenth century. He shows how local ambitions took advantage of the imperial design and situates Havana within the slavery and economic systems of the colonial Atlantic.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Port Shipping and Trade
11
The Fleets and the Service Economy
51
Urban Growth
81
Production
118
Slavery and the Making of a Racial Order
147
The People of the Land
186
Epilogue
223
Notes
229
Bibliography
263
Index
281
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Alejandro de la Fuente is University Center for International Studies Research Professor of History and Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

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