Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years

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G.K. Hall, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 268 pages

Warm, feisty, and intelligent, the Delany sisters speak their mind in a book that is at once a vital historical record and a moving portrait of two remarkable women who continued to love, laugh, and embrace life after over 100 years of living side by side. Their sharp memories show readers the post-Reconstruction South and Booker T, Washington; Harlem's Golden Age and Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, and Paul Robeson. Bessie breaks barriers to become a dentist; Sadie quietly integrates the New York City system as a school teacher.

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User Review  - laytonwoman3rd - www.librarything.com

Two sisters of mixed parentage, both over 100 years of age, share their observations on life from a unique perspective. Their father was born into slavery, but became the first black bishop in the ... Read full review

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User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

Don't remember this too well, but do remember that I had it in my Permanent Collection for over a decade, over a few moves - a strong indication of a book I enjoyed! Read full review

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About the author (1993)

Sarah Louise (Sadie) Delany was born in 1889. Her father was a former slave and her mother's parents were a free African American woman and a white Virginia farmer. Sarah Delany had nine siblings, including her sister, Elizabeth, born in 1891, with whom she co-authored Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years. The book chronicles the story of their well-lived lives with wit and wisdom. It begins with an idyllic childhood in North Carolina where their father was the principal of St. Augustine's School. The legislation of Jim Crow laws prompted their move to Harlem. Sarah Delany attended Pratt College, becoming a high school teacher, and Elizabeth Delany attended Columbia University, becoming a dentist. The sisters experienced most of the 20th century and describe major events such as the struggle for Civil Rights and their feelings about it. Delany has also coauthored The Delany Sisters' Book of Everyday Wisdom and On My Own at 107: Reflections on Life Without Bessie, written following the death of her sister.

Delany received her degree in dentistry from Columbia University and was the second black woman licensed to practice dentistry in New York City.

The author of The New York Times bestseller "Having Our Story: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years".

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