Haydn: The 'Paris' Symphonies

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 24, 1998 - Music - 124 pages
0 Reviews
Haydn's Symphonies Nos. 82-7 are seminal works in Haydn's output and mark a new level of compositional attainment, launching the important cycle of mature Haydn symphonies written for an international audience. Three chapters of the book deal with the reception of Haydn's symphonies in Paris, documenting the extent to which they dominated the repertoire of important public concert series. The aesthetic basis of Haydn's reception in Paris in the 1780s is considered in discussions of the notions of 'popular' and 'learned' taste and such notions inform the commentaries on the symphonies themselves. Thus as well as discussing technical features of Symphonies Nos. 82-7, broader concerns include the relationship between orchestral splendour and eighteenth-century notions of beauty; the relationship between genius, originality and convention; irony and humour; and the updating of popular orchestral taste.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Haydns music and the Concert spiritual
5
Les deux Stabats
9
Hegemony and genius
13
The apogee of the Haydn symphony at the Concert spirituel 178890
20
Popular taste
26
Learned taste
34
Splendour and beauty Symphonies Nos 82 and 86
45
Convention and originality Symphony No 85
69
Irony and humour Symphony No 83
81
The refinement of popular taste Symphonies Nos 84 and 87
89
Notes
100
Select bibliography
117
Index
122
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information