He Knew He was Right, Volume 2

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Strahan, 1869 - England
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User Review  - pgchuis - LibraryThing

Mainly about the quarrel which arises between Emily Trevelyan and her husband Louis over her friendship with Colonel Osborne, known to be a home-wrecker, but a friend of Emily's father. This quarrel ... Read full review

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User Review  - davegregg - LibraryThing

This came highly recommended by a friend. She loves digging into characters, and this book certainly does that. But however much I tried, I just could not finish this book. I get stressed out when I'm ... Read full review

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Page 42 - Who would ever think of learning to live out of an English novel ? " said Carry. " I am not saying that. You may teach him to live how you like afterwards. But if you have anything to do with people, it must be well to know what their manners are. I think the richer sort of people in England slide into these things more gradually than we do. You stand your ground, Carry, and hold your own, and take the {roods the gods provide you.
Page 54 - Mr Glascock had made up his mind that he could not dare to ask Caroline Spalding to be his wife. There were certain forms of the American female so dreadful that no wise man would wilfully come in contact with them. Miss Petrie's ferocity was distressing to him, but her eloquence and enthusiasm were worse even than her ferocity. The personal incivility of which she had been guilty in calling him a withered grass was distasteful to him, as being opposed to his ideas of the customs of society; but...
Page 238 - If you have a baby, they'll let you go and see it two or three times a day. I don't suppose you will be allowed to nurse it, because they never do in England. You have read what the Saturday Review says...
Page 46 - Can he manage that men shall have half the babies ? " said Mr. Glascock, thinking to escape by an attempt at playfulness. But the minister was down upon him at once, — had him by the lappet of his coat, though he knew how important it was for his dear niece that he shouk allow Mr.
Page 14 - Because they're just nobodies. They are not anything particular to anybody, and so they go on living till they die. You know what I mean, Mr. Burgess. A man who is a nobody can perhaps make himself somebody, — or, at any rate, he can try; but a woman has no means of trying. She is a nobody, and a nobody she must remain. She has her clothes and her food, but she isn't wanted anywhere.
Page 357 - What is all that we have read about the Inquisition and the old tortures ? I have had to learn that torturing has not gone out of the world ; — that is all.
Page 14 - A man who is a nobody can perhaps make himself somebody, — or at any rate, he can try; but a woman has no means of trying. She is a nobody, and a nobody she must remain. She has her clothes and her food, but she isn't wanted anywhere. People put up with her, and that is about the best of her luck.
Page 126 - Stone ascribes his weakness to "some mysterious agency [that] interferes with the affairs of a man and drives him on, — and on, — and on, — almost, — till he doesn't know where it drives him
Page 261 - Thought deep, correct, continued, and energetic is quite compatible with madness. At this time Trevelyan's mind was so far unhinged, his ordinary faculties were so greatly impaired, that they who declared him to be mad were justified in their declaration.
Page 376 - And he was mad; — mad though every doctor in England had called him sane. Had he not been mad he must have been a fiend, — or he could not have tortured, as he had done, the woman to whom he owed the closest protection which one human being can give to another.

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