Health Care Benchmarking and Performance Evaluation: An Assessment using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 8, 2007 - Business & Economics - 217 pages

One of the most pressing problems in today’s health care system is performance evaluation. Performance evaluation in health care goes well beyond financial and efficiently issues directly to matters of life and death. Health Care Benchmarking and Performance Evaluation applies the analytical framework of Data Envelopment Analysis methodology to provide health care administrators with specific benchmarking tools for performance evaluation. Most important, the book provides health care practitioners and administrators with information of what is lacking in specific aspects of performance and then outlines the ways how these performance inadequacies can be improved.

Professor Ozcan is a professor of Health Administration at Virginia Commonwealth University and the Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Health Care Management Science. He has written a book that will have wide use in the academic and practitioner health care communities. It is a book that will be particularly influential in the application and utility of performance measures in the health care systems worldwide.

 

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Contents

75 Other DEA Models
99
76 Summary
100
Applications
101
Hospital Applications
102
82 Defining Service Production Process in Hospital Sector
104
83 Inputs and Outputs for General Hospitals
106
832 Hospital Outputs
107
84 Acute and General Hospital Applications
109

132 The LeastSquares Regression
9
133 Total Factor Productivity TFP
11
134 Stochastic Frontier Analysis SFA
12
14 Measurement Difficulties in Health Care
13
Performance Measurement Using Data Envelopment Analysis DEA
15
221 Efficiency Measures
16
222 Efficiency Evaluations Using DEA
17
223 Effectiveness Measures
21
24 Model Orientation
23
26 Decision Making Unit DMU
24
28 Example for InputOriented CRS DEA Model
25
29 Interpretation of the Results
28
292 Slacks
29
293 Efficient Targets for Inputs and Outputs
30
210 InputOriented Model Benchmarks
31
211 OutputOriented Models
32
212 OutputOriented CRS DEA Model
33
213 Interpretation of OutputOriented CRS Results
34
2131 Efficiency and Inefficiency
35
2133 Efficient Targets for Inputs and Outputs
36
214 OutputOriented Model Benchmarks
37
A1 Mathematical Details
38
B1 Mathematical Details for Slacks
39
B2 Determination of Fully Efficient and Weakly Efficient DMUs
40
C1 CRS OutputOriented Model Formulation
41
Returns to Scale Models
42
33 Assessment of RTS
47
35 InputOriented VRS DEA Model Results
48
36 Slacks and Efficient Targets for InputOriented VRS Model
49
37 Benchmarks for InputOriented VRS Model
50
39 OutputOriented VRS Model Results
51
310 Comparison of CRS and VRS Models and Scale Efficiency
54
311 Summary
55
D2 Efficient Target Calculations for InputOriented VRS Model
56
Multiplier Models
57
42 Multiplier Models
58
43 Assurance Regions or Cone Ratio Models
59
44 Assessment of Upper and Lower Bound Weights
61
45 Multiplier Weight Restricted Model Example
64
46 Summary
68
NonOriented and Measure Specific Models
71
52 Measure Specific Models
75
53 Summary
78
Appendix G
79
H2 Efficient Target Calculations for InputOriented Measure Specific Model
80
12 Efficient Target Calculation for OutputOriented Measure Specific Model
81
Longititudunal Panel Evaluations Using DEA
82
62 MalmquistDEA Efficiency Example
84
63 Summary
90
Effectiveness and Other Models of DEA
93
73 Quality as an Independent Output
95
74 Combining Efficiency Benchmarks and Quality Scores
97
85 Large Size General Hospital Performance Evaluation
110
86 Federal Government Hospitals VA and DoD
115
87 Academic Medical Center Applications
116
88 Summary
117
Physician Practice and Disease Specific Applications
119
92 Production of Services in Physician Practice
120
921 Physician Practice Inputs
121
922 Related Costs for Visits ER Hospitalizations Lab and Radiology Medications and Durable Medical Equipment
123
93 Physician Practice Applications
124
932 Measuring Physician Performance for Sinusitis
130
933 Measuring Physician Performance for Asthma
132
94 Summary
139
CPT Based Claim Processing and Data Development Source Ozcan 1998
140
J2 CPT Code Creep
141
Nursing Home Applications
143
102 Nursing Home Performance Studies
144
103 Performance Model for Nursing Homes
146
104 Data for Nursing Home Performance Evaluations
148
105 An Example of Performance Model for Nursing Homes
149
1052 Homogeneous Groups and Descriptive Statistics
150
1053 DEA Results
151
1054 Conclusion
152
106 Summary
153
Health Maintenance Organization HMO Applications
154
113 Performance Model for HMOs
157
115 Summary
158
Home Health Agency Applications
159
122 Home Health Agency Performance Studies
160
123 Performance Model for Home Health Agencies
161
124 Data for Home Health Agency Performance Evaluations
162
1252 Homogeneous Groups and Descriptive Statistics
164
1254 Conclusion
167
Applications for Other Health Care Organizations
169
133 Community Mental Health Centers
171
134 Community Based Youth Services
174
135 Organ Procurement Organizations
175
136 Aging Agencies
176
137 Dental Providers
178
138 Summary
179
Other DEA Applications at Hospital Settings
180
143 Benchmarking Mechanical Ventilation Services
182
144 Market Capture of Inpatient Perioperative Services
184
145 Physicians at Hospital Setting
185
146 Hospital Mergers
186
147 Hospital Closures
187
149 Hospital Service Production in Local Markets
188
1410 Sensitivity Analysis for Hospital Service Production
189
References
191
Index
199
Running the DEAFrontier Limited Version
204
About the Author
213
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Yasar A. Ozcan is professor of Health Administration at Virginia Commonwealth University. Dr. Ozcan is editor-in-chief of Journal of Health Care Management Science and past president of the Health Care Applications Section of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS).

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