Health and Medicine in Early Medieval Southern Italy

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BRILL, 1997 - History - 183 pages
2 Reviews
Medical historians are already familiar with medieval southern Italy through research into its famed medical school at Salerno. This volume takes a broader view of healthcare, seeking to illuminate the experience of sickness, attitudes towards the ill and infirm and the provision of care up to the twelfth century. Combining information from hagiography and chronicles with less well-known charters and archaeology, it deals with the provision of food, the environment, women's health, individual and collective disease and varieties of cure. A final chapter assesses the interaction between intellectual and practical medicine, as well as re-examining the early life of the medical school at Salerno. The book's importance lies in its wide-ranging approach and detailed analysis, which will appeal to historians of medicine and medieval culture alike.
 

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Contents

Food and Famine
3
Individual and Environment
22
Pregnancy and Childrearing
40
Sickness in the Community
57
Doctors Hospitals and Cures
79
Recording the Dead
108
Texts and the School of Salerno
127
Integrating the Southern Italian Evidence
137
A miracle of St Trophimena provides a cure
148
A survey of minimum ages at Gaeta
155
Map
163
Bibliography
173
Index
181
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About the author (1997)

Patricia Skinner, Ph.D. (1990) in Medieval History, University of Birmingham, is Lecturer in Humanities at the University of Southampton. Her thesis was published as "Family Power in Southern Italy" ("CUP," 1995), and she has published several articles on the social history of the region.

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