Health and Wellness in Antiquity Through the Middle Ages

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ABC-CLIO, 2012 - History - 251 pages
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Health and Wellness in Antiquity through the Middle Ages compares and contrasts health-care practices in seven different cultures from around the world. In considering the range of medical practitioners in each society, and the kinds of health care they provided, it examines the development of a written medical tradition, the methods of medical education, the practice of surgery, and the theories and practices of pharmacy. Other topics include the application of medicine in specific contexts, such as the treatment of women, children, and those with mental illness.

Another important theme explored is the impact of religion and state institutions on the development, implementation, and results of medical care as experienced by real people in real life. Throughout, the book offers an international historical perspective, which allows for greater comparative and critical understanding of how different cultural beliefs influenced the development and management of health care.

 

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Contents

1 Factors in Health and Wellness
1
Learned and NonLearned
17
3 Religion and Medicine
43
4 Womens Health
59
5 Health in Infancy Childhood and Old Age
81
6 Infectious Disease in the Premodern World
101
7 Environmental and Occupational Hazards
121
8 Surgery and Manual Operations
135
10 The Apothecary and His Pharmacopeia
175
11 War and Health
193
12 Institutions and Health
205
13 Healing and the Arts
221
Glossary
231
Suggestions for Further Reading
235
Bibliography
239
Index
245

9 The Brain and Mental Disorders
159

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About the author (2012)

William H. York is assistant professor of interdisciplinary studies in the University Honors Program at Portland State University, Portland, OR.

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