Health Care Litigation Reform: Does Limitless Litigation Restrict Access to Health Care? : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, Second Session, June 12, 2002

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Page 101 - Medicine (ACPASIM) — representing 115,000 physicians and medical students — is the largest medical specialty society and the second largest medical organization in the United States. We congratulate the...
Page 42 - The Legislature finds and declares that there is a major health care crisis in the State of California attributable to skyrocketing malpractice premium costs and resulting in a potential breakdown of the health delivery system, severe hardships for the medically indigent, a denial of access for the economically marginal, and depletion of physicians such as to substantially worsen the quality of health care available to citizens of this state. The Legislature, acting within the scope of its police...
Page 97 - This crisis also means that community clinics must cutback services, jeopardizing the nation's 39 million uninsured patients — the majority of them women and children — who rely on community clinics for health care. Unable to shift higher insurance costs to their patients, these clinics have no alternative but to care for fewer people. Acting now can save more women from the ranks of the uninsured. Health care costs continue to increase overall, including the cost of private health care coverage....
Page 95 - Across the country, liability insurance for obstetrician/gynecologists has become prohibitively expensive. Premiums have tripled and quadrupled practically overnight. In some areas, Ob/Gyns can no longer obtain liability insurance at all, as insurance companies fold or abruptly stop insuring doctors. When Ob/Gyns cannot find or afford liability insurance, they are forced to stop delivering babies, curtail surgical services, or close their doors. The shortage of care affects hospitals, public health...
Page 22 - Before the Subcomm. on Economic Stabilization of the House Comm. on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, 99th Cong.
Page 96 - ... for gynecologic cancers, hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, osteoporosis, sexually transmitted diseases, and other serious health problems. Staggering premiums continue to burden women's health care professionals and will further diminish the availability of women's care. Federal legislation is needed to avert another rural health crisis. Women in underserved rural areas have historically been particularly hard hit by the loss of physicians and other women's health care professionals....
Page 57 - Barr that it doesn't necessarily rise to constitutional implications, but it certainly rises to questions about why we need two Commissions and why the composition is to be controlled the way it is. So I'll leave that alone and yield back the balance of my time. Mr. BARR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 minutes. Mr. SCHUMER. Thank you. And I'm sympathetic to Mr. Gallegos
Page 99 - For the rest of the state, including Pittsburgh, the median was $410,000. • One-quarter of respondents to an informal ACOG poll of Pennsylvania ob-gyns say they have stopped or are planning to stop the practice of obstetrics. 80% of medical students who come to the state for a world-class education ultimately choose to practice elsewhere, according to the Pennsylvania State Medical Society. • On April 24, 2002, Methodist Hospital in South Philadelphia announced that it will stop delivering babies...
Page 54 - The gentleman from North Carolina, Mr. Watt, is recognized for 5 minutes. Mr. WATT. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I...
Page 96 - When confronted with substantially higher costs for liability coverage, ob-gyns and other women's health 81-49102 -2 care professionals stop delivering babies, reduce the number they do deliver, and further cut back — or eliminate — care for high-risk mothers. With fewer women's health care professionals, access to early prenatal care will also be reduced, depriving them of the proven benefits of early intervention.

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