Healthcare Architecture in an Era of Radical Transformation

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Yale University Press, 2000 - Architecture - 404 pages
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In the 1960s and 1970s large, high-technology, inpatient oriented hospitals reflected the central role of such facilities in an expanding healthcare system. But hospital architecture and the healthcare system have vastly changed since then, in profound and unpredicted ways. This book explores for the first time how and why acute care hospitals and the often related psychiatric facilities, retirement communities, and community clinics have been transformed during the final decades of the twentieth century.

The authors also consider utopian visions of unbuilt work and look ahead to the possible healthcare landscape of the future: "health villages,” home-based care for the aging and aged population, and cyberclinics and virtual hospitals.

 

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Contents

Introduction The Six Waves of Health Architecture
3
The Hospital as a Machine for Healing
17
An Imperfect Machine for an Imperfect System 197080
63
Utopian Excursions
95
Reinventing the Hospital
133
Reinventing the Patient Room
195
Architectural Environments for the Aged 19652000
223
The Community Care Clinic
279
Frontiers of a Transformed Landscape
329
Notes
353
Index
391
Illustration Credits
401
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About the author (2000)

Stephen Verderber is professor of architecture and health systems management at Tulane University, a registered architect, and co-principal of R-2ARCH, Los Angeles and New Orleans. David J. Fine is Regents Professor and chair of the department of health systems management at Tulane University and emeritus vice chancellor of the Tulane University Medical Center.

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