Hearing on the Fair Labor Standards Act: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Labor Standards of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-ninth Congress, First Session, Hearing Held in Washington, DC, on September 24, 1985

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Page 206 - ... and If his hours of work fluctuate from week to week, his regular rate of pay will vary from week to week and will be the average hourly rate each week. Suppose that during the course of four weeks the employee works 40, 44, 50, and 47 hours. His regular hourly rate of pay in each of these weeks is approximately $1.65, $1.50, $1.32, and $1.40, respectively. Since the employee has already received straight-time compensation on a salary basis for all hours worked, only additional half-time pay...
Page 101 - FINDING AND DECLARATION OF POLICY SEC. 2. (a) The Congress hereby finds that the existence, in industries engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce, of labor conditions detrimental to the maintenance of the minimum standard of living necessary for health, efficiency, and general well-being of workers...
Page 64 - Congress' treatment of public mass transit reinforces our conviction that the national political process systematically protects States from the risk of having their functions in that area handicapped by Commerce Clause regulation. This analysis makes clear that Congress...
Page 96 - suffer or permit to work" was "obviously not intended to stamp all persons as employees who, without any express or implied compensation agreement, might work for their own advantage on the premises of another."20 In United States v.
Page 101 - The Court holds that the Federal Government may not interfere with a sovereign state's inherent right to pay a substandard wage to the janitor at the state capitol. The principle on which the holding rests is difficult to perceive. The Federal Government may, I believe, require the State to act impartially when it hires or fires the janitor, to withhold taxes from his...
Page 96 - Individuals who volunteer or donate their services, usually on a part-time basis, for public service, religious, or humanitarian objectives, not as employees and without contemplation of pay, are not considered as employees of the religious, charitable, and similar nonprofit organizations which receive their services.
Page 7 - function" standard applied in these and other cases over the last eight years now persuades us that the attempt to draw the boundaries of state regulatory immunity in terms of "traditional governmental function...
Page 45 - September 30, 1963, and September 3, 1964, or in excess of 42 hours in any week between September 3, 1964 and September 3, 1965), overtime rates must be paid. Whether or not he worked in excess of 40 hours in any week (or in excess of such other maximum workweek as may apply) , records for such an employee would have to be kept in accordance with the regulations covering records for nonexempt employees (Part 516 of this chapter) . [28 FR 9505, Aug.
Page 99 - Court had held that the extension of provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act to state and local government employees engaged in areas of traditional governmental functions...
Page 113 - Act of 1938 states that it is the policy of the act to correct and as rapidly as practicable to eliminate labor conditions detrimental to the maintenance of the minimum standard of living necessary for the health, efficiency, and general well-being of workers.

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