Hearing the Other Side: Deliberative Versus Participatory Democracy

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 13, 2006 - Political Science - 171 pages
'Religion and politics', as the old saying goes, 'should never be discussed in mixed company.'And yet fostering discussions that cross lines of political difference has long been a central concern of political theorists. More recently, it has also become a cause célèbre for pundits and civic-minded citizens wanting to improve the health of American democracy. But only recently have scholars begun empirical investigations of where and with what consequences people interact with those whose political views differ from their own. Hearing the Other Side examines this theme in the context of the contemporary United States. It is unique in its effort to link political theory with empirical research. Drawing on her empirical work, Mutz suggests that it is doubtful that an extremely activist political culture can also be a heavily deliberative one.
 

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About the author (2006)

Diana C. Mutz is Samuel A. Stouffer Professor of Political Science and Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She also serves as Director of the Institute for the Study of Citizens and Politics at the Annenberg Public Policy Center. Mutz received her PhD from Stanford University in 1988. She has published articles involving public opinion, political psychology and political communication in a variety of academic journals including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Politics, and Journal of Communication. She is also the author of Impersonal Influence: How Perceptions of Mass Collectives Affect Political Attitudes (1998), a book awarded the 1999 Robert Lane Prize for the Best Book in Political Psychology by the American Political Science Association, and the 2004 Doris Graber Prize for Most Influential Book on Political Communication published in the last ten years.

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